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Will classic cars have driver assists implemented as per the era?

Quattro7Quattro7 Member New Car Smell
Brilliant news that the 2006 Renault R26 is the lastest classic car to be added. 
My question is will these classic cars have the driver assists that the era they raced in allowed be implemented in the game? 
The Renault R26 should have traction control as would the Ferrari F2004 but also the F2002 would have auto-gears too. 
Not a problem if they don't as we can just turn them on in the settings but it would be a neat trick for players that never raced these cars in a game before to experience them as they were and fans that weren't around in that era can see exactly what they've missed!!

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Answers

  • AyrotonS296AyrotonS296 Member Unleaded
    I'm sorry to say mate, but no F1 car in the past 30 years has had automatic gears, if you read the rules, they've been banned since semi-automatic gearing was introduced.

    As for the other assists, it's understandable why they should be like that, but for someone like me, driving with no assists is more fun, and I would rather handle the F2002 without any assists, so I reckon the best option is to just turn them on for whatever car your driving.
  • JamesGJamesG Member Pit Crew
    edited July 8
    All cars have traction control, it's a video game. If you want TC you can enable it in the assists menu as always. How else would they implement it? Some sort of override for the 2002-2007 cars?
  • carpacarpa Member Co-Driver
    I heard in a video that yes, F2002 did have sone assists built in. I don't know if they can be completely turned off but I think so.
    Other cars from the same era will be the same I guess
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  • haydn23haydn23 Member Petrol Head
    The assists shouldn't be built in. Even in the days of traction control, you could turn it off and on at will.

    yes you could as lewis said in '07 if I just turned my tc off I would have got out of the gravel. As I believe they could adjust the tc level on the move. But that's like ers now codies cba to do something that key to the game, that would make it soo much more realistic and soo much better, and like **** miles up the road better. Instead they do something not demanded as much. **** delusional
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  • Quattro7Quattro7 Member New Car Smell
    I'm sorry to say mate, but no F1 car in the past 30 years has had automatic gears, if you read the rules, they've been banned since semi-automatic gearing was introduced.

    As for the other assists, it's understandable why they should be like that, but for someone like me, driving with no assists is more fun, and I would rather handle the F2002 without any assists, so I reckon the best option is to just turn them on for whatever car your driving.
    This is not true. I've built wiring harnesses for Formula 1 since 2000. In 2002 the cars ran with traction control, launch control and automatic up and down shift. Watch some onboard footage of the cars and you can see the driver moving the paddles but the gears aren't changing, they are pre-selecting up and down shifts so when they press the button that selection becomes programmed. Montoya in the Williams at Magny Cours in France in 2002 is the best example, search for it on YouTube. 
  • Quattro7Quattro7 Member New Car Smell
    edited July 9
    The assists shouldn't be built in. Even in the days of traction control, you could turn it off and on at will.
    Yes they could but for tyre life and consistency no driver did unless it was for reliability. No driver is better at managing traction than the computer. When Damon Hill was test driver at Williams he complained that the TC kept cutting the engine, it was no good. His engineer replied "But it is a second a lap faster!" 
  • Quattro7Quattro7 Member New Car Smell
    JamesG said:
    All cars have traction control, it's a video game. If you want TC you can enable it in the assists menu as always. How else would they implement it? Some sort of override for the 2002-2007 cars?
    Yes. Exactly that. 
  • JamesGJamesG Member Pit Crew
    JamesG said:
    All cars have traction control, it's a video game. If you want TC you can enable it in the assists menu as always. How else would they implement it? Some sort of override for the 2002-2007 cars?
    I've always liked the way Assetto Corsa does it, with a 'factory' setting for each car's TC and ABS, in addition to the off/medium/full settings.
    Yeah, that's probably the way to do it. Have "Factory" in the assists menu and then for the cars with TC you can mess with it in the setup menu or directional button menu when you're out on track.

    But I doubt they'd do this, it'll probably make things unnecessarily complicated for the coders.
  • Quattro7Quattro7 Member New Car Smell
    JamesG said:
    All cars have traction control, it's a video game. If you want TC you can enable it in the assists menu as always. How else would they implement it? Some sort of override for the 2002-2007 cars?
    I've always liked the way Assetto Corsa does it, with a 'factory' setting for each car's TC and ABS, in addition to the off/medium/full settings.
    Yes that would be the perfect solution. Like "Real" assists in Project Cars also. 
  • FOneFanaticFOneFanatic Member, Drivers Team Principal
    JamesG said:
    All cars have traction control, it's a video game. If you want TC you can enable it in the assists menu as always. How else would they implement it? Some sort of override for the 2002-2007 cars?
    I've always liked the way Assetto Corsa does it, with a 'factory' setting for each car's TC and ABS, in addition to the off/medium/full settings.
    You're mixing up apples and oranges, as this is an F1 regulated game and AS is not. That means the current regulations do not permit any kind of assists, so the factory setting will be NO ASSISTS! As is the wont, you will have the option to apply the various game assists, complimentary of Codemasters, as this is still a game. What I would like to see happen is that all player be force into playing cockpit view with no assists! Yikes!  
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  • AyrotonS296AyrotonS296 Member Unleaded
    edited July 13
    Quattro7 said:
    I'm sorry to say mate, but no F1 car in the past 30 years has had automatic gears, if you read the rules, they've been banned since semi-automatic gearing was introduced.

    As for the other assists, it's understandable why they should be like that, but for someone like me, driving with no assists is more fun, and I would rather handle the F2002 without any assists, so I reckon the best option is to just turn them on for whatever car your driving.
    This is not true. I've built wiring harnesses for Formula 1 since 2000. In 2002 the cars ran with traction control, launch control and automatic up and down shift. Watch some onboard footage of the cars and you can see the driver moving the paddles but the gears aren't changing, they are pre-selecting up and down shifts so when they press the button that selection becomes programmed. Montoya in the Williams at Magny Cours in France in 2002 is the best example, search for it on YouTube. 
    Link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Formula_One_car#Transmission

    Formula One cars use semi-automatic sequential gearboxes, with regulations stating that 8 forward gears (increased from 7 from the 2014 season onwards)[8] and 1 reverse gear must be used, with rear-wheel drive.[9] The gearbox is constructed of carbon titanium, as heat dissipation is a critical issue, and is bolted onto the back of the engine.[10] Full automatic gearboxes, and systems such as launch control and traction control, are illegal, to keep driver skill important in controlling the car.[10] The driver initiates gear changes using paddles mounted on the back of the steering wheel and electro-hydraulics perform the actual change as well as throttle control. Clutch control is also performed electro-hydraulically, except to and from a standstill, when the driver operates the clutch using a lever mounted on the back of the steering wheel.[11]

    Link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ferrari_F2002 

    Transmission: Semi-automatic Sequential Limited-slip Differential Gearbox Seven Speed Forward + One reverse
  • doyley101doyley101 Member Wheel Nut
    Quattro7 said:
    I'm sorry to say mate, but no F1 car in the past 30 years has had automatic gears, if you read the rules, they've been banned since semi-automatic gearing was introduced.

    As for the other assists, it's understandable why they should be like that, but for someone like me, driving with no assists is more fun, and I would rather handle the F2002 without any assists, so I reckon the best option is to just turn them on for whatever car your driving.
    This is not true. I've built wiring harnesses for Formula 1 since 2000. In 2002 the cars ran with traction control, launch control and automatic up and down shift. Watch some onboard footage of the cars and you can see the driver moving the paddles but the gears aren't changing, they are pre-selecting up and down shifts so when they press the button that selection becomes programmed. Montoya in the Williams at Magny Cours in France in 2002 is the best example, search for it on YouTube. 
    Link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Formula_One_car#Transmission

    Formula One cars use semi-automatic sequential gearboxes, with regulations stating that 8 forward gears (increased from 7 from the 2014 season onwards)[8] and 1 reverse gear must be used, with rear-wheel drive.[9] The gearbox is constructed of carbon titanium, as heat dissipation is a critical issue, and is bolted onto the back of the engine.[10] Full automatic gearboxes, and systems such as launch control and traction control, are illegal, to keep driver skill important in controlling the car.[10] The driver initiates gear changes using paddles mounted on the back of the steering wheel and electro-hydraulics perform the actual change as well as throttle control. Clutch control is also performed electro-hydraulically, except to and from a standstill, when the driver operates the clutch using a lever mounted on the back of the steering wheel.[11]

    Link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ferrari_F2002 

    Transmission: Semi-automatic Sequential Limited-slip Differential Gearbox Seven Speed Forward + One reverse
    Computer controlled shifting was banned at some point in the mid 2000s (2005?). whilst mechanically it's still a semi auto sequential gearbox, the cars could be coded to send the impulse to the box to shift automatically at optimum rpm. The drivers could also 'queue up' down shifts which would then occur at optimum times during braking.
  • AyrotonS296AyrotonS296 Member Unleaded
    edited July 15
  • Quattro7Quattro7 Member New Car Smell
    doyley101 said:
    Quattro7 said:
    I'm sorry to say mate, but no F1 car in the past 30 years has had automatic gears, if you read the rules, they've been banned since semi-automatic gearing was introduced.

    As for the other assists, it's understandable why they should be like that, but for someone like me, driving with no assists is more fun, and I would rather handle the F2002 without any assists, so I reckon the best option is to just turn them on for whatever car your driving.
    This is not true. I've built wiring harnesses for Formula 1 since 2000. In 2002 the cars ran with traction control, launch control and automatic up and down shift. Watch some onboard footage of the cars and you can see the driver moving the paddles but the gears aren't changing, they are pre-selecting up and down shifts so when they press the button that selection becomes programmed. Montoya in the Williams at Magny Cours in France in 2002 is the best example, search for it on YouTube. 
    Link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Formula_One_car#Transmission

    Formula One cars use semi-automatic sequential gearboxes, with regulations stating that 8 forward gears (increased from 7 from the 2014 season onwards)[8] and 1 reverse gear must be used, with rear-wheel drive.[9] The gearbox is constructed of carbon titanium, as heat dissipation is a critical issue, and is bolted onto the back of the engine.[10] Full automatic gearboxes, and systems such as launch control and traction control, are illegal, to keep driver skill important in controlling the car.[10] The driver initiates gear changes using paddles mounted on the back of the steering wheel and electro-hydraulics perform the actual change as well as throttle control. Clutch control is also performed electro-hydraulically, except to and from a standstill, when the driver operates the clutch using a lever mounted on the back of the steering wheel.[11]

    Link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ferrari_F2002 

    Transmission: Semi-automatic Sequential Limited-slip Differential Gearbox Seven Speed Forward + One reverse
    Computer controlled shifting was banned at some point in the mid 2000s (2005?). whilst mechanically it's still a semi auto sequential gearbox, the cars could be coded to send the impulse to the box to shift automatically at optimum rpm. The drivers could also 'queue up' down shifts which would then occur at optimum times during braking.
    Thank you. Some one that knows their history of the regs. AyrotonS296 uses wiki for his info but it's not comprehensive. 
    As my OP said it would be nice if this was implemented on the cars of that era in the game. 
  • AyrotonS296AyrotonS296 Member Unleaded
    Automatic Gears would mean no input from the driver, these gearboxes still had input from the driver, therefore they are semi-automatic
  • Quattro7Quattro7 Member New Car Smell
    Automatic Gears would mean no input from the driver, these gearboxes still had input from the driver, therefore they are semi-automatic
    Yes I get your point. The cars did shift themselves though without the driver's input also. If they'd wanted they need not have touched the paddles and the cars would have still shifted. 

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