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Camber and 'increased downforce'

NB90NB90 Member New Car Smell

I believed that negative camber added more cornering ability to the car.  Therefore, if you move the slider to the left i.e. add more negative camber, then your cornering ability should improve.

But the 'increased downforce' setup actually goes the other way, moving the camber ticker further to the right.

Is this not the inverse of what should happen?

Comments

  • cdma86cdma86 Member New Car Smell
    edited January 2
    NB90 said:

    I believed that negative camber added more cornering ability to the car.  Therefore, if you move the slider to the left i.e. add more negative camber, then your cornering ability should improve.

    But the 'increased downforce' setup actually goes the other way, moving the camber ticker further to the right.

    Is this not the inverse of what should happen?

    I think the setup is ok. I don't remember it exactly, but the camber info says something like: the negative camber is better for prolonged curves

    do a test in Monaco with minimum and maximum camber. -2.5 has better cornering than -3.5. Monaco has short curves,
    but Silverstone/Spa/Spain... have long curves and the setup works inverse: -3.5 is better than -2.5

    The 'increased downforce' setup assumes that the circuit has a lot of short curves with very few/short straights

    There is no camber "position" that works for every circuit/curve. You have to ask:
    most curves are short? you have to move the slider to the right
    most curves are long? you have to move the slider to the left


  • Ho3n3rHo3n3r Member Co-Driver
    It's not a case of "more is better". The aim of camber is to optimise the contact patch area in relation to the track and its type of corners.

    For example, at Monza the most prevalent features are long, straight braking zones, and mostly straight acceleration zones, which would mean that less than default camber will work better here, i.e. -2.8 front, -1.3 rear.

    But at a track like Suzuka, which has many lateral force - i.e. fast - corners, as well as many non-linear acceleration and braking zones, you are better off with more camber - about -3.3 front and -1.7 rear works well here.

    But, then you come to car characteristics as well. I used a timetrial setup for a Mercedes where I used -.1.6 rear camber, and it worked the best. However, when I loaded it onto my career mode Toro Rosso, the rear was just awful and I had to reduce the rear camber to -1.4. I presume it's due to the less load on the tyre, which in turn causes less cornering speed and thus less lateral forces, which means -1.6 is not a very good camber value for maximising contact patch on the Toro Rosso's rear tyres.

    So no, your understanding is incorrect - more camber does not equal more grip in all scenarios. In fact, I can't think of any scenario where you'll be better off running maximum at the rear or the front.
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