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VetteIfan

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  1. I agree. It's rare you see a rookie start off so poorly and then turn in to something amazing. Normally a special driver is obvious from the moment they start racing. Ricciardo is maybe an example to the contrary but that's about all I can think of in recent times.  He was touted as the next Hamilton and did very un-Hamilton like things against Alonso. I don't think he's a bad driver but his junior career record has preceded him. Also iirc Norris needed to be signed by McLaren now or he was free to sign with another team for next season. Much better to risk Vandoorne moving out of the Mc
  2. It seems to me that Mercedes, Ferrari and McLaren are taking on way more young drivers than they can handle. They fund all these guys career's only for there to be no space at F1 level. It doesn't make sense. It's good for RB though. As the only big team with a true development team they've put themselves in a position where they can now pick off the "rejected" drivers and take them on. One of Vandoorne or Norris seems likely at this point, and I wouldn't even rule out Giovinazzi or Ocon if they have no other options. It's the equivalent of another guy buying a girl drinks at a club all nigh
  3. Relevancy relevancy relevancy. My least favourite word in motorsport. For me now if F1 wants to avoid the fate of electric racing, the mindset needs to shift from "How do we make this sport relevant?" to more "How do we attract manufacturers without the incentive of relevancy?". Idk if it's possible. Glory and advertising potential of winning on the biggest stage in motorsport will always be an incentive but it's not enough on its own. Manufacturers usually think financially, so it needs to be made so they can make a healthy profit from doing it, to overcome any lack of relevancy
  4. In the words of Stephen A Smith, "I like it but I don't love it" I like it because in all probability it's a no lose situation for Ricciardo. Red Bull will not be contending for titles for the next two seasons, Ricciardo gets to prove his worth further against a strong driver in Hulkenberg and his options are still wide open for 2021. He's probably getting nicely paid too while he waits to see if Renault will turn in to a front runner.  I don't love it though for the reason that this isn't a Hamilton to Mercedes, Vettel to Ferrari, Alonso to McLaren move. All those guys wanted to move t
  5. I literally have no idea who's in charge under the new 'simplified technical leadership team'. Peak McLaren. 
  6. Yeah Ferrari are maybe the one exception. The team does take priority over any driver in Italy, which tbf can't be said for the British teams/drivers.  No it's not. In football you support a club and that takes primary importance because the club's name is the one that goes down in the record books, not that of an individual. Last time I checked football teams don't drop in and out of the sport either.  You're also typically from the place/area of the football club you support as well so there's a lot deeper connection in general. But if that's your view you're a pretty lousy f
  7. That doesn't make you a Ferrari fan, that just makes you a fan who has mutual interest with Ferrari fans in Ferrari winning because it means Leclerc will be winning. Kinda like me now.  As a side note on the Mclaren point, pinning loyalty to a team is not something I'd personally ever be interested in as an F1 fan. You'd always have to go through some phase where your team hires an uninspiring driver pairing, or a period of time where the team becomes completely inept like Mclaren now. You also get teams like Mercedes and Red Bull who are clearly not in F1 for the long haul so what's the
  8. The problem is this driving style is a big weakness if/when he's ever in a position to challenge for the title. The Red Bull is a good car but not a title winner. There will have to be compromise at some point even if at the moment it's only costing him occasional wins.  That's been a very notable change in Lewis' driving as his career has gone on. It's ironic because his idol is Senna but he drives more like a peak Prost these days (and that's not detrimentally speaking because that went at least some way towards him winning the title last season). 
  9. Football matches are 90 mins. Grand slam tennis matches are normally 90-120 mins at least. NBA games are around 2 hours with timeouts taken in to consideration. And most F1 races are around the 80-100 mins mark.  I'd like someone from Liberty to explain why the races being too long is apparently an issue, when every other popular sport on earth has roughly the same timeframe. Shorter races won't attract more viewers. 
  10. Never understood the hype about refuelling. From 1993 in to 1994 (when refuelling was introduced) overtaking numbers declined sharply. Then between 1994 and 2009 when refuelling was active, overtaking was at its lowest amount in the past 40 years. In 2010 (before DRS and Pirelli tyres) overtaking numbers then rose sharply again when it was banned.  Considering the fact it's also less safe, more expensive and makes qualifying worse, I'm not for bringing it back.  In my opinion it also actually makes strategy worse too. Back in the early 2000's if you had a few laps more fuel the
  11. Agree with the pessimism surrounding the blue flag removal idea. It sounds great on paper until a great race for the lead is ruined just so we don't disturb the battle for 15th place. Illogical.  The only F1 TV personality I've seen publicly in favour of the proposal is David Croft. That alone should be a massive red flag to the idea. 
  12. The best way to get rid of grid penalties is to get to the root of why they're limited to a certain amount in the first place - cost. Lower cost for parts means they can have more of them for the same amount of money. Pretty straight forward.  The gearbox is probably the worst case in point because they're the most obvious thing that should be made spec on these cars imo. They make no significant impact on performance, the fans never see them and yet teams are spending millions developing/buying them in the name of making the cars independent from each other every year. It's dumb. 
  13. Agreed. As a new team, it's better that they buy from Ferrari and compete rather than drive around the back like Caterham, Marrusia and HRT did for years in the name of having their own "identity".  Mclaren's moaning is just sour grapes that they can't outqualify a team with half their budget.  And the complaining from Force India is ironic considering they first big jump up the grid came in 2009 from buying a tonne of tech from Mclaren.
  14. Brundle and Davidson are the only F1 minds on TV that I actually like to sit down and listen to. Ben Edwards is tolerable. Other than that I don't have much love for any of them.  Crofty, Kravitz and Herbert are all clowns who have been in jobs for way too long.  Lazenby and Wolff are a whole lot of nothing.  Coulthard is neither here nor there for me. I see a lot of fans raving about him but I don't personally understand why.  And Chandhok might just be my worse F1 TV personality of all time. The guy is also labelled as the "technical expert" on Channel 4's coverage. A
  15. Probably never going to get the chance to post this again so here goes.  Kimi Raikkonen has an instagram account. https://www.instagram.com/kimimatiasraikkonen/ Kimi Raikkonen has more instagram posts than Lewis Hamilton. https://www.instagram.com/lewishamilton/ Crazy huh. Gotta hand it to Lewis though. He continually finds stupid things to do to hinder his reputation. I know the world is way too sensitive about this stuff and most people will see this for what it is, a joke. But given his standing as an almost celebrity, I'm surprised he didn't work out that snapchat post was a bad
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