Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Community Rally School -Having questions bout driving techniques, game features, setups...? Go here!

Recommended Posts

I've got three questions guys. I just got pedals with the clutch and wanted to use them with a shifter in Dirt Rally and Dirt 4. Being used to driving with two pedals (left foot braking), I find it really difficult to adjust to driving with a clutch and manual H gearbox. What's more effective, driving like in the real car (right foot for throttle and brake, left for clutch), or keeping your right foot on the throttle and having left foot operate brake and clutch? How did real rally drivers drive?
I started with just driving like my real car (left foot clutch, right foot for accelerator and brake) and then slowly learning left foot brake, foot switching and heel-toe, can find various footages to demonstrate it on Youtube.
Also, to keep things realistic, I assume H gear pattern and clutch should be used with historic cars, because modern cars have sequential gearbox and clutch is just used for the start. Am I right? Could anyone tell me roughly what combinations of pedals/gearboxes did different groups have? 
wherever possible I try to match the setting to what fits the car, all group B cars, 60's, 70's, H1, H2, H3 are manual H pattern, Group A is H pattern except for the Lancer evo, also ford Cosworth is a 7 speed and I only have a 6 speed H shifter so sometimes I have to drive that on sequential mode. up to 2000cc and 2000's cars in Dirt Rally and Dirt 4 are all sequential I think, NR4's/R4's are manual H-pattern. I'm less familiar with the Rallycross cars.
And the last question (maybe a little dumb), do rally drivers use a handbrake or a clutch nowadays on the start line to rev the engine before the green light? 
I think in 2000's era sequentials they used the clutch and handbrake to start(was described by colin mcrae in his Focus), not sure how the most modern WRC cars do it but I always use the clutch and handbraking in whatever car.
Colin mcrae focus:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D1_u3-eyXmU&

my own gameplay in RS200 with pedalcam:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WaPWfox0KmU

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks for the answers guys, very helpful posts! Damn, I didn't even know you should use the clutch pedal when applying handbrake on the hairpins.  :o  Heel and toe is also new for me, it looks crazy. Time to practice my driving technique....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks for the answers guys, very helpful posts! Damn, I didn't even know you should use the clutch pedal when applying handbrake on the hairpins.  :o  Heel and toe is also new for me, it looks crazy. Time to practice my driving technique....
Welcome to Rally ;) Sometimes you might want to use the clutch in thight corners even without the use of the handbrake, it's a technique called "clutch kicking" and it helps reduce the understeer in thight corners. Heel and toe instead is very useful with manual cars to have smooth gear changes in order not to unsettle the car during high braking. With the sequentials this function is automatically applied by the electronics
Here you can see how with a modern sequential car (the 2003 Subaru Impreza WRC) the clutch is used only at the start:

https://youtu.be/LGk1p3-3kgY

Here instead you can see how Walter Röhrl handled his manual Audi Sport quattro back in 1985:

https://youtu.be/yyVHj3sHVHQ

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
One more question guys. Do you happen to know what steering lock do WRC drivers use in 2017 season? I'm used to 540 degrees, but I see that in WRC7 the default lock is set to 630, which made me wonder. Or does it depend on the driver/ manufacturer?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×