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How do you measure tyre degredation through your setup?

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I'm trying to improve my understanding of setting the car up and how to get the most out of it. Things like cornering stability and straight line speed are (relatively) easy to measure but how can I quantify my tyre deg changes when refining my setup?

The best solution I have at the moment is to check the % tyre deg over 3/4 laps, come in, change setup and go again for 3/4 laps, checking my tyre deg % all the while. This is on the assumption that tyre deg remains constant (if our driving is consistent) over the tyre life, which the pre race strategies and tyre deg practice simulation suggest. However, as deg increases, my driving consistency drops and I lock up that bit more, enter corners a bit too fast etc etc. I feel all of this causes tyre deg to increase faster the older the tyres are and my races definitely suggest this.

Anyway, does anyone have a clever way to evaluate how they are doing on tyre deg when making setup changes?

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I think the most effective way to see your degradation is to perform the tire management test in free practice. Be sure to use all the compounds to get a rough idea. Ultimately, driving style has a greater effect on tire degradation than vehicle setup. 

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Yeah, I certainly do every tyre management test in practice but just on the one setup. Thanks, I'll try testing setups using the management test. I have heard that driving style will have a greater effect but I want to know how we can measure set up differences more than anything.

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Your camber settings make a large difference to your tyre wear. As you increase the angle of the tyre you're exerting the same amount of force on a smaller surface area of the tyre, thus subjecting it to more wear. Lower camber angles reduce this wear by dissipating that force somewhat, and also helps traction, which can improve traction which reduces wear coming out of slow corners, but can also cause front-end push/understeer in fast corners, which causes additional front tyre wear. Balance there is important.

Differential also affects wear. A locked diff increases it as the wheels find it harder to rotate at different speeds through a corner, so your rears may begin underrotating in a tight corner, causing understeer and skidding, but aiding straight line traction. Conversely, opening the diff allows the wheels more freedom in different speeds, which mitigates the underrotation and therefore the tyre wear, but will result in additional wheelspin on careless throttle application.

Downforce also makes a small difference. Too much downforce means you overload the tyres in the corners and leads to overheating, blistering and increased wear. Too little downforces causes skidding and instability which leads to increased tyre wear. You need to find the sweet spot for the wings to maximise the performance/tyre wear balance.

Suspension also affects it. Too loose and your car will excessively lean on the outside tyres in a corner, leading to increased wear and slower speed, but too tight and the car will be too rigid in the corner and won't respond well to directional changes.

But like has been mention. Setup changes only go so far to mitigate tyre wear. Most tyre saving comes from a change in driving style. Brake earlier and gentler, ensuring to avoid lockups, coast through apexes, maximise traction out of slow corners, avoid wheelspin and drifting, and lift off the power through prolonged corners to avoid placing excess wear on a tyre. It'll cost you a few tenths per lap, but it might be worth it if it saves you a pit stop against everybody else. 

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Camber can make a difference but at the end of the day, your driving style is going to play a much bigger factor (mainly if you play no assists) for prolonging tire life.
Being smooth on the throttle, releasing pressure on brakes at the right time to avoid lockups, avoiding full lock through high speed turns will do more for making your tires go longer than  any setup will. 

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