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[TUTORIAL] How to use the differential adjust during race

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The differential on throttle works like it does in real life. A more locked diff will give you more grip, but if you overload the outside tire it will break traction very quickly and spin. A more open diff will not have as much pure grip, but will break traction in a much smoother manner.

The way you should use this is based on the amount of grip available from the track and tires. For example, in FP1 the track is very low grip. The diff should be turned down or you will get excessive wheel spin when exiting corners. The softer the tires, the more grip they give initially, so you can turn up the diff to get more performance from them. When you start to get corner exit oversteer, start going back down on the diff to match the grip level.

That is the easy way to control power on oversteer. You can also do it corner by corner if you can keep up. Faster corners like higher diff levels, lower speed corners where you need more traction forgiveness, turn the diff back down.

The hards like 60s, mediums 70s, softs 80s and supersofts 90s utras 100 when they are brand new. 

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The differential on throttle works like it does in real life. A more locked diff will give you more grip, but if you overload the outside tire it will break traction very quickly and spin. A more open diff will not have as much pure grip, but will break traction in a much smoother manner.

The way you should use this is based on the amount of grip available from the track and tires. For example, in FP1 the track is very low grip. The diff should be turned down or you will get excessive wheel spin when exiting corners. The softer the tires, the more grip they give initially, so you can turn up the diff to get more performance from them. When you start to get corner exit oversteer, start going back down on the diff to match the grip level.

That is the easy way to control power on oversteer. You can also do it corner by corner if you can keep up. Faster corners like higher diff levels, lower speed corners where you need more traction forgiveness, turn the diff back down.

The hards like 60s, mediums 70s, softs 80s and supersofts 90s utras 100 when they are brand new. 

Thanks for this. Any advice for the wet? 

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MachOne1 said:
Thanks for this. Any advice for the wet? 
Depends on the level of grip that you have. The more grip you have, the higher you can set the diff. So, in the wet, it's probably best to lower it a lot.

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MachOne1 said:
Thanks for this. Any advice for the wet? 
Depends on the level of grip that you have. The more grip you have, the higher you can set the diff. So, in the wet, it's probably best to lower it a lot.

Thank you. Will try it.

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Tbh, not sure if I'm alone, but I'm finding changing Diff settings and Brake Balance settings on the HUD so fiddly in a live racing situation that I've decided I'm losing more time making the adjustments than I am gaining from the advantage the adjustments possibly give.

Basically have to open up the HUD with circle or arrow button then scroll to Diff then +/1 however many clicks (same for BB) and the info is tiny and difficult to read at a glance. Impossible to lower the Diff/BB after the exit of 130R and before the chicane at Suzuka for instance. 

I think it would be amazing to be able to pre-programe buttons for +/- on BB and Diff so it becomes 1 click rather than multiple click and read...

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In project cars is easy as you can use any button in the wheel to do so.... 

Just a quesiton about explanations above; do that apply aldo in case you use TC ON ?? 

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Woqrr said:
In project cars is easy as you can use any button in the wheel to do so.... 

Just a quesiton about explanations above; do that apply aldo in case you use TC ON ?? 
I use a Controller without any assists :)

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Yes but I have the impression that even with TC ON,  rear wheels also spin specially when tyres are used at 40% and higher...

I will make a few chances to check this.

Thanks for the explanations so clear

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@Rinehart27 I agree with you, fiddling with setup during the race is dangerous. Makes for a good "don't text and drive" ad. :smiley:
Personally I try to avoid it for a number of reason (and in fact, when I use the rewind feature it's often because I smashed into a wall while trying to change something) one of which is that I think I should adapt to the car/track conditions, not the other way around. So if tyres start losing grip, I go easy on the gas (but to be honest, I generally have a very open diff).
One thing that I regularly mess around with is the fuel mix, but that's pretty ok as it's only one button to press and you don't need to do it multiple times during a lap.

@Woqrr I don't use the TC, so I can't really say

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https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Dma19YrbRq8

This is a lap I did a while ago after reading this post on reddit. I feel changing diff for each corner certainly does a make a difference (if not, it's just a useful placebo effect) but for a race, especially a long one, it would get annoying and very distracting.

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You do not have to change it for every corner. 

For those who find it too stressful, it is enough to use the basic values ​​I have mentioned for each mix. Just change it before the start and after a pit stop. 

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You do not have to change it for every corner. 

For those who find it too stressful, it is enough to use the basic values ​​I have mentioned for each mix. Just change it before the start and after a pit stop. 
Hi Staa... interesting topic.

I would try an "intermediate" solution.  By applying "basic values" to each tyre type,  we could also lower differential as the tyres wear out. 

For instance lets say I begin race with Medium Tyres = Diferential at 70 (basic value). 

Lap 1 to 8 /  Medium tyre wear < 20% = differential at 70.
Lap 9 to 15 /  Medium tyre wear > 20% = diferential at 60
Lapt 15 to 20 / Medium tyre wear > 40% = differential at 50

does this make sense to you ?

thanks for your input

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Thanks for this post, try it later. I’m doing league racing next race Monaco. Does this apply to off throttle to ? Thanks. 

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I wish there were a lot more helpful posts like this on the forum, instead of so much complaining all the time!

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The differential in real life works like this. 

The slower the corner the more chance of wheel slip so the more open (towards the left or lower value) you need the diff to be able to balance the slip. The faster corners can handle a locked diff as there is less chance of wheel slip so you can maximise the potential of the cars pace. 

 

Michael Schumacher was the main man at this back in the day. Watch onboards hot laps of him. He is constantly changing the diff. 

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Big numbers on steering led during changing could be very useful

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I see that most people prefer low diff settings, especially in the wet. I do the opposite. In full wet conditions I usually have 90-100 on throttle differential. It makes it easier to rotate the rear in corners with throttle application instead of steering input. The rear wheels spin more easily, but when I do get wheelspin I lose less time than when having wheelspin with low diff settings. That's always been my feeling anyways.

Edited by janbonator

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On 9/7/2019 at 8:53 AM, inspiretheworld said:

The differential in real life works like this. 

The slower the corner the more chance of wheel slip so the more open (towards the left or lower value) you need the diff to be able to balance the slip. The faster corners can handle a locked diff as there is less chance of wheel slip so you can maximise the potential of the cars pace. 

 

Michael Schumacher was the main man at this back in the day. Watch onboards hot laps of him. He is constantly changing the diff. 

Thanks for the info it’s best way someone to explained it so far to me. Going use lower diff in Monaco. Off throttle not sure about guess it’s the same ?

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On 9/8/2019 at 10:29 AM, Hill0 said:

Thanks for the info it’s best way someone to explained it so far to me. Going use lower diff in Monaco. Off throttle not sure about guess it’s the same ?

Off throttle is generally for corner entry. If you are under steering on entry, lower the Off/Decel diff. If you are over steering on entry, increase the diff.

On/Accell helps mid corner on longer corners, too. For instance, the first long sweeping right at Catalunya. If you're having trouble keeping the car in the race line there, turn up the On/Accel diff.

It's good to adjust Brake bias and On diff during the race.  

Off throttle just keep it around around 75 and adjust from there.

Edited by DaleRossi
Meant first sweeping Right, not left, at Catalunya
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