Jump to content
DIRT 5 - Chat about the game and get support here. Read more... ×

DiRTy Gossip about DIRT Rally Games

PJTierney

 

Message added by PJTierney

Recommended Posts

Alf72 said:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VsXNSKmM-Ds

My body is too short for Gravel... but Unreal 4 can do wonders



One of those ‘speed cross’ or whatever they called it tracks looked pretty similar to montalegre...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alf72 said:
Gravel video
One of those ‘speed cross’ or whatever they called it tracks looked pretty similar to montalegre...
There are some more familiar faces other than Montalegre


Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alf72 said:
Gravel video
One of those ‘speed cross’ or whatever they called it tracks looked pretty similar to montalegre...
There are some more familiar faces other than Montalegre


Looks like Loheac, Hell, Trois Rivieres and Montalagre from the current World RX tracks, plus Franciacorta as well. I wonder if "Riga" is the Latvian World RX track as well? The outline there looks wrong?  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tbtstt said:
Alf72 said:
Gravel video
One of those ‘speed cross’ or whatever they called it tracks looked pretty similar to montalegre...
There are some more familiar faces other than Montalegre


Looks like Loheac, Hell, Trois Rivieres and Montalagre from the current World RX tracks, plus Franciacorta as well. I wonder if "Riga" is the Latvian World RX track as well? The outline there looks wrong?  
Oh, didn’t realise it was actually the real track, it just looked really bad in the video so I thought it was a knock off!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kuris said:
urgaffel said:
Photos: https://www.flickr.com/photos/urgaffel/sets/72157670050146226

I'm terrible at uploading stuff but I did manage to squeeze the 1000+ photos from that trip into the set above :)
Great photos! thanks for sharing.

Here's a bunch of photos of my this year's trip to Tokyo. https://flic.kr/s/aHsm8KBhz5 in case you or @tbtstt want to check them out

And here's some muscle cars from this year's local car event / gathering. And a possible hint to a Muscle car DLC :P
https://flic.kr/s/aHsm4VHLuy

Dude! Those photos are sick! Really well done. Those parks in Japan (or whatever they are called) are so nice. I love how everything has a artistic element to it. Also love the rally cars. The Impreza is my favorite.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kuris said:
urgaffel said:
Photos: https://www.flickr.com/photos/urgaffel/sets/72157670050146226

I'm terrible at uploading stuff but I did manage to squeeze the 1000+ photos from that trip into the set above :)
Great photos! thanks for sharing.

Here's a bunch of photos of my this year's trip to Tokyo. https://flic.kr/s/aHsm8KBhz5 in case you or @tbtstt want to check them out

And here's some muscle cars from this year's local car event / gathering. And a possible hint to a Muscle car DLC :P
https://flic.kr/s/aHsm4VHLuy

Dude! Those photos are sick! Really well done. Those parks in Japan (or whatever they are called) are so nice. I love how everything has a artistic element to it. Also love the rally cars. The Impreza is my favorite.
Thanks a lot! Yeah, some of them are parks and some of them are gardens. They are breathtakingly beautiful. If I have to pick one thing I enjoyed the most it's easily the gardens. I loved to spend my day just walking around those gardens, photographing and enjoying the scenery.

My favorite car is that Celica ST185 and the Subarus looked really nice as well. Both cars had McRae's name on but can't say for sure if they were actually driven by him. Not that it matters to me, it was nice to see his name on those cars.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I like that they attempt to give the setting and drivers some personality. Not many  racing games do things like that anymore
The first Forza Horizon did that, man that was a great game. Then 2 and 3 basically got rid of any actual progression system at all. The first game I got most of the cars just from winning the races, they scrapped that.

UE4 being free... makes me slightly concerned. You used to be able tell whether a tiny indie game in Steam was crap or not based on graphics/engine, but now you can't. Best I can figure is whether or not it looks like it's using all stock assets and UE's trademark super glossy "PBR photorealistic" materials.

I'm also about 50/50 on thinking whether Gravel could be fun or just mediocre. It's slightly competing with Forza Horizon, so I wonder how well it'll do.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JZStudios said:

UE4 being free... makes me slightly concerned. You used to be able tell whether a tiny indie game in Steam was crap or not based on graphics/engine, but now you can't.
This is super offtopic, but I disagree massively with this type of statement. I understand where it's coming from, it's harder than ever to differentiate between a successful, well-designed indie title and a bargain bin trash heap but the existence of free to use engines has been a massive boon for the games industry. Back in the mid-late 2000s any game using Game Maker to make a 2d experience was looked down upon because, of course, most Game Maker games were trash made in 20 minutes by some teenager but with games like Hotline Miami and Undertale being produced, that stigma is at least partially gone. With 3d titles, Unity was and is seen as a sign of a game's lack of polish or quality but with every year more really amazing titles like Subnautica pop up and show that the engine isn't at fault for that, and with time UE4 will have the same.
The reality is that free engines mean that people who would've never made or finished a game can now do so, and that means, yes, people who want to make a completely amateur cashgrab with little to no inspiration can make games but so can amazing artists and dev teams who otherwise would've never had the chance. The things that make it hard for a consumer to differentiate between the two is a lack of filtering and selection for distributors (steam's given up on moderating games released on their system) and the abuse of the early access model to get away with basically never finishing a game rather than having a very clear plan and release path and simply using early access to get funds earlier than one would otherwise and get immediate, widespread feedback on the game itself. These are the problems the industry faces, not the proliferation of tools to make games.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JZStudios said:

UE4 being free... makes me slightly concerned. You used to be able tell whether a tiny indie game in Steam was crap or not based on graphics/engine, but now you can't.
This is super offtopic, but I disagree massively with this type of statement. I understand where it's coming from, it's harder than ever to differentiate between a successful, well-designed indie title and a bargain bin trash heap but the existence of free to use engines has been a massive boon for the games industry. Back in the mid-late 2000s any game using Game Maker to make a 2d experience was looked down upon because, of course, most Game Maker games were trash made in 20 minutes by some teenager but with games like Hotline Miami and Undertale being produced, that stigma is at least partially gone. With 3d titles, Unity was and is seen as a sign of a game's lack of polish or quality but with every year more really amazing titles like Subnautica pop up and show that the engine isn't at fault for that, and with time UE4 will have the same.
The reality is that free engines mean that people who would've never made or finished a game can now do so, and that means, yes, people who want to make a completely amateur cashgrab with little to no inspiration can make games but so can amazing artists and dev teams who otherwise would've never had the chance. The things that make it hard for a consumer to differentiate between the two is a lack of filtering and selection for distributors (steam's given up on moderating games released on their system) and the abuse of the early access model to get away with basically never finishing a game rather than having a very clear plan and release path and simply using early access to get funds earlier than one would otherwise and get immediate, widespread feedback on the game itself. These are the problems the industry faces, not the proliferation of tools to make games.
I again disagree. There's nothing wrong with Game Maker or Unity, but a few years ago you had to put effort into it for it look appealing in any way in order to make it stand out. Hotline Miami did that.
My point is that you USED to have to either put in a decent amount of effort and create your own assets with a unique style, or buy nice assets, of which still had to fit a cohesive style.. Now, especially with UE4 any dingbat can "make a game" in 20 minutes and look visually similar to a better made game. There's still a slight variance in materials/models, but even triple A games fall into the Epic trap of using seemingly standard assets and materials... which I guess also says something there.
I mean, I followed some tutorials for UE4, but I'm not putting them up on Steam for sale, while others are, and VISUALLY it doesn't look terrible at a glance. On the flip side, for the indie devs that ARE dedicated, UE4 being free is nice since it is a better platform than Unity, except they want your royalties.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tbtstt said:
Alf72 said:
Gravel video
One of those ‘speed cross’ or whatever they called it tracks looked pretty similar to montalegre...
There are some more familiar faces other than Montalegre


Looks like Loheac, Hell, Trois Rivieres and Montalagre from the current World RX tracks, plus Franciacorta as well. I wonder if "Riga" is the Latvian World RX track as well? The outline there looks wrong?  
Oh, didn’t realise it was actually the real track, it just looked really bad in the video so I thought it was a knock off!
I just listed what I can could see on that menu screen! I just watched the video and the clip shown at 2:45 definitely looks like (a rather poor representation) of the last series of corners at Montalagre.

Interestingly the screen shots at 2:35 and 2:39 look exactly like Buxtehude to me. 

Seeing more real rallycross tracks in another game makes me want more rallycross tracks in DiRT 4 even more!  


Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JZStudios said:
JZStudios said:

UE4 being free... makes me slightly concerned. You used to be able tell whether a tiny indie game in Steam was crap or not based on graphics/engine, but now you can't.
This is super offtopic, but I disagree massively with this type of statement. I understand where it's coming from, it's harder than ever to differentiate between a successful, well-designed indie title and a bargain bin trash heap but the existence of free to use engines has been a massive boon for the games industry. Back in the mid-late 2000s any game using Game Maker to make a 2d experience was looked down upon because, of course, most Game Maker games were trash made in 20 minutes by some teenager but with games like Hotline Miami and Undertale being produced, that stigma is at least partially gone. With 3d titles, Unity was and is seen as a sign of a game's lack of polish or quality but with every year more really amazing titles like Subnautica pop up and show that the engine isn't at fault for that, and with time UE4 will have the same.
The reality is that free engines mean that people who would've never made or finished a game can now do so, and that means, yes, people who want to make a completely amateur cashgrab with little to no inspiration can make games but so can amazing artists and dev teams who otherwise would've never had the chance. The things that make it hard for a consumer to differentiate between the two is a lack of filtering and selection for distributors (steam's given up on moderating games released on their system) and the abuse of the early access model to get away with basically never finishing a game rather than having a very clear plan and release path and simply using early access to get funds earlier than one would otherwise and get immediate, widespread feedback on the game itself. These are the problems the industry faces, not the proliferation of tools to make games.
I again disagree. There's nothing wrong with Game Maker or Unity, but a few years ago you had to put effort into it for it look appealing in any way in order to make it stand out. Hotline Miami did that.
My point is that you USED to have to either put in a decent amount of effort and create your own assets with a unique style, or buy nice assets, of which still had to fit a cohesive style.. Now, especially with UE4 any dingbat can "make a game" in 20 minutes and look visually similar to a better made game. There's still a slight variance in materials/models, but even triple A games fall into the Epic trap of using seemingly standard assets and materials... which I guess also says something there.
I mean, I followed some tutorials for UE4, but I'm not putting them up on Steam for sale, while others are, and VISUALLY it doesn't look terrible at a glance. On the flip side, for the indie devs that ARE dedicated, UE4 being free is nice since it is a better platform than Unity, except they want your royalties.
I like that there is now more to a "good game" than just shiny graphics, I have had plenty of great experiences from less shiny games (loving Moon Hunters right now).  There is a lot of asset flipping going on now, there is no denying it.  I think the Steam refund system is amazing (and as a console user I am jealous).  Pick up a game, try it for two hours and decide if it gets to keep that money or not.  For me I need to read some reviews, watch a few videos and hope they are all on the same mindset I am.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gameplay > graphics.

Every time... and twice on Sundays.

There's more to games than just visuals. Not even the best graphics can turn bad gameplay into a good game.

Some games got popular by reusing aspects of other games but applying gameplay that was so much better, the spin-off's popularity outgrew the original's.

If there are free/affordable assets/engines to help good gameplay designers get better-quality games out, that's a win for gamers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alf72 said:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VsXNSKmM-Ds

Gravel looks to me kinda like an evolutionary re-imagining of DiRT 2 (without all the "dude-bro"-ness) by people who thought: "what would DiRT 2 be like today if we updated it?"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Today it's 14 years since Petter Solberg won the WRC.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oBsN__InFOU

I still remember watching it on TV with my Father.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tbtstt said:


Seeing more real rallycross tracks in another game makes me want more rallycross tracks in DiRT 4 even more!  
If you haven't tried ProjectCars2, the RallyX there is really quite good IMO, and it has a couple of interesting tracks that D4 doesn't have. The RallyX may be the best bits of the title (PC2) but, some of the other content is decent and may get better as the game gets patched over the course of the coming months.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
CMMcBabe said:
JZStudios said:
JZStudios said:

UE4 being free... makes me slightly concerned. You used to be able tell whether a tiny indie game in Steam was crap or not based on graphics/engine, but now you can't.
This is super offtopic, but I disagree massively with this type of statement. I understand where it's coming from, it's harder than ever to differentiate between a successful, well-designed indie title and a bargain bin trash heap but the existence of free to use engines has been a massive boon for the games industry. Back in the mid-late 2000s any game using Game Maker to make a 2d experience was looked down upon because, of course, most Game Maker games were trash made in 20 minutes by some teenager but with games like Hotline Miami and Undertale being produced, that stigma is at least partially gone. With 3d titles, Unity was and is seen as a sign of a game's lack of polish or quality but with every year more really amazing titles like Subnautica pop up and show that the engine isn't at fault for that, and with time UE4 will have the same.
The reality is that free engines mean that people who would've never made or finished a game can now do so, and that means, yes, people who want to make a completely amateur cashgrab with little to no inspiration can make games but so can amazing artists and dev teams who otherwise would've never had the chance. The things that make it hard for a consumer to differentiate between the two is a lack of filtering and selection for distributors (steam's given up on moderating games released on their system) and the abuse of the early access model to get away with basically never finishing a game rather than having a very clear plan and release path and simply using early access to get funds earlier than one would otherwise and get immediate, widespread feedback on the game itself. These are the problems the industry faces, not the proliferation of tools to make games.
I again disagree. There's nothing wrong with Game Maker or Unity, but a few years ago you had to put effort into it for it look appealing in any way in order to make it stand out. Hotline Miami did that.
My point is that you USED to have to either put in a decent amount of effort and create your own assets with a unique style, or buy nice assets, of which still had to fit a cohesive style.. Now, especially with UE4 any dingbat can "make a game" in 20 minutes and look visually similar to a better made game. There's still a slight variance in materials/models, but even triple A games fall into the Epic trap of using seemingly standard assets and materials... which I guess also says something there.
I mean, I followed some tutorials for UE4, but I'm not putting them up on Steam for sale, while others are, and VISUALLY it doesn't look terrible at a glance. On the flip side, for the indie devs that ARE dedicated, UE4 being free is nice since it is a better platform than Unity, except they want your royalties.
I like that there is now more to a "good game" than just shiny graphics, I have had plenty of great experiences from less shiny games (loving Moon Hunters right now).  There is a lot of asset flipping going on now, there is no denying it.  I think the Steam refund system is amazing (and as a console user I am jealous).  Pick up a game, try it for two hours and decide if it gets to keep that money or not.  For me I need to read some reviews, watch a few videos and hope they are all on the same mindset I am.
2 hours is a tiny window on a platform that often requires lots of tweaks to get the game running well. You must also only purchase digital, because I have zero issues selling/returning/trading/lending/borrowing physical copies that no longer exists on PC due to Steam. I have games I'd like to gift or share with my brother since I won't be playing them probably ever again really, but Steam HATES that. You can do a "family" plan or whatever, but then only one user can be on at a time, which is retarded.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Operator1 said:
Gameplay > graphics.

Every time... and twice on Sundays.

There's more to games than just visuals. Not even the best graphics can turn bad gameplay into a good game.

Some games got popular by reusing aspects of other games but applying gameplay that was so much better, the spin-off's popularity outgrew the original's.

If there are free/affordable assets/engines to help good gameplay designers get better-quality games out, that's a win for gamers.

Okay, so again, bad games oft look shitty. EVERY game that's been mentioned as "Bad looking" has in fact NOT been bad looking. You may as well say that Fez looks terrible, or the Witness, Monaco, Ori and the Blind Forest, Anodyne, Basically ANY of the Zelda games beyond 2, Bastion, Child of Light, or Oxenfree. And those are just games from my collection.
Except that NONE of those look terrible. They all have a clearly defined art style that fits the aesthetic of the game they're going for. Not to mention that most of them are objectively beautiful. You could also add Firewatch to that list based on your definition of "bad graphics"
They ALL had thought, time, and effort put into the visuals. A strong art direction indicates a level of care and craft. Asset flipping does not. I mean, I bought The Vanishing of Ethan Carter just because it's pretty. Poor art direction and obvious asset flips indicate there's probably not a lot of car going into the product.
P.S. Subnautica and other well made indie games based on Unity have a clear coherent art style, of which is not shit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JZStudios said
P.S. Subnautica and other well made indie games based on Unity have a clear coherent art style, of which is not ****.
The issue of games having flashy graphics but with a bland, lifeless artstyle often turning out to be mediocre is not something caused just by UE4 and Unity and so on. Back in the 360 era I was constantly looking out for games with the plastic sheen of a completely unedited Unreal 3 post processing set, because generally speaking that meant a game had little care put into it. The classic example I use is the Rainbow Six Vegas games - the assets are all AAA-grade, but even in a still screenshot you can tell how completely uninspired the game was.
With asset stores and other methods to quickly pump out a title (which, by the way, have very little to do with engines being free), you can see plenty of games that have AAA-grade graphics but, at least in my experience, it's exceptionally easy to tell how uninspired they are without even touching them. Games with a more unique artstyle due to limited budget are often where I struggle, and that's been an issue since the beginning of indie gaming.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Finally got round to having a proper look through the albums posted by @urgaffel and @Kuris last night: excellent stuff and a timely reminder that I need to get my finger out and plan a trip! 

The Mitaka Subaru showroom is one of the first places I need to visit when I eventually get out there!
Kuris said:

My favorite car is that Celica ST185 and the Subarus looked really nice as well. Both cars had McRae's name on but can't say for sure if they were actually driven by him. Not that it matters to me, it was nice to see his name on those cars. 
On the assumption the number plates are legitimate, that is the Legacy Colin won the 1993 Rally New Zealand in and the Impreza that McRae drove in San Remo and Rally GB in 1998: so you have seen cars he actually drove @Kuris! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JZStudios said:
Operator1 said:
Gameplay > graphics.

Every time... and twice on Sundays.

There's more to games than just visuals. Not even the best graphics can turn bad gameplay into a good game.

Some games got popular by reusing aspects of other games but applying gameplay that was so much better, the spin-off's popularity outgrew the original's.

If there are free/affordable assets/engines to help good gameplay designers get better-quality games out, that's a win for gamers.

Okay, so again, bad games oft look shitty. EVERY game that's been mentioned as "Bad looking" has in fact NOT been bad looking. You may as well say that Fez looks terrible, or the Witness, Monaco, Ori and the Blind Forest, Anodyne, Basically ANY of the Zelda games beyond 2, Bastion, Child of Light, or Oxenfree. And those are just games from my collection.
Except that NONE of those look terrible. They all have a clearly defined art style that fits the aesthetic of the game they're going for. Not to mention that most of them are objectively beautiful. You could also add Firewatch to that list based on your definition of "bad graphics"
They ALL had thought, time, and effort put into the visuals. A strong art direction indicates a level of care and craft. Asset flipping does not. I mean, I bought The Vanishing of Ethan Carter just because it's pretty. Poor art direction and obvious asset flips indicate there's probably not a lot of car going into the product.
P.S. Subnautica and other well made indie games based on Unity have a clear coherent art style, of which is not ****.
Firewatch is a beautiful Unity game.  Coherent art direction matters so much, I love Supergiant games for that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ehm, it's november. Any news from the offices?
Should i install the game again or not?

More than "DiRT 4", the game has become "DuST 4gotten"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DoubleTen said:
Ehm, it's november. Any news from the offices?
Should i install the game again or not?

More than "DiRT 4", the game has become "DuST 4gotten"
Yes, Devs just posted this on all social media.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tbtstt said:
I wonder if "Riga" is the Latvian World RX track as well? The outline there looks wrong?  
The outline is from the whole track, not just the rallycross layout


Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×