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Front brake bias and Differential


LeedsUnited21

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The differential controls the rates at which the wheels spin in sync with each other. A higher diff percentage can increase traction at low speed but too high can cause instability at the rear. Most tracks I run 80% on throttle and 75% off throttle, for places with massively important traction zones like Monza I would go 85% and 80%. Anymore than that you're going to have problems keeping the car stable.

Brake bias is how much of the braking pressure you've applied through the pedal is handled by the front and rear brakes. Front bias helps slow the car in large braking zones (like into a hairpin) but too much front bias will mean you will lock up a lot. Rear bias is helpful in fast flowing corners and chicanes as it gives a more even braking across the axis of the car meaning you won;t wobble under brakes and are less likely to lock up. I run 60% front bias and again at a track like Monza I might go 65% at most. As for front brake pressure don't go too high as you'll lock up, probably no more than 85% on heaving braking tracks like Monza and around 80% max everywhere else. Leave your rear brake pressures alone unless you're really confident with how you want to drive the car.

Hope that answers your question :)
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In essence and very basic explanation for brake bias is if you need more braking power such as a long straight followed by a hairpin it would be beneficial to have brake bias more to the front.  For chicanes etc. where you need to brake but don't need to brake to hard and would like to keep some speed and momentum going moving the brake bias more to the back would be better.

That is making it simple...then obviously if you are going downhill moving the brake bias to the front will increase braking power...if you are going uphill moving it backwards will result in more braking power.

This is if weight transition is simulated correctly...not to be rude or dissing the game at all it is not aiming to be a simulator so I wouldn't worry about downhill and uphill ;)
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R9NALD09 said:
In essence and very basic explanation for brake bias is if you need more braking power such as a long straight followed by a hairpin it would be beneficial to have brake bias more to the front.  For chicanes etc. where you need to brake but don't need to brake to hard and would like to keep some speed and momentum going moving the brake bias more to the back would be better.

That is making it simple...then obviously if you are going downhill moving the brake bias to the front will increase braking power...if you are going uphill moving it backwards will result in more braking power.

This is if weight transition is simulated correctly...not to be rude or dissing the game at all it is not aiming to be a simulator so I wouldn't worry about downhill and uphill ;)
Yeah I agree that the weight transfer is lacking, but its still kind of there and is still a factor when setting up brake bias and pressures. :)
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