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hola said:
TheHemps said:
He had years to get it right and all he does is blame the technology available [u]and the staff under him[/u]. Bit cowardly if you ask me.
It is a poor shepherd that blames his flock
Only a fool would presume those statements to be true.  Many a battle has been lost despite good leadership.  I have no idea of the inner workings of this project, but having read these forums over the years and having bought each game except for the last one, I feel for those working on it.  I do not know who is to blame for the issues and neither do you.
Yeah I do. The people making the game. And the people above them have to take responsibility.

Catch up. World's only worked like that for oooooohh, 500 years.

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I think Steve Hood and Codemasters forgot that when they're run out of new gimmicks to put into the game (like live the life and classic cars), as happened with F1 2014, the main F1 fanbase are the ones most likely to continue buying the game, but only if you give them a reason to. What we saw with the Codemasters F1 series under Steve Hood was a systematic disregard of the main F1 fanbase in favour of a game that tried to appeal mainly to casual racers. The stripping down of the race weekend, the poor AI, the limited damage, the poor track evolution, the Mario Kart handling, and the fact that there isn't really a dry line that appears when the track goes from wet to dry (they had it in F1 2010 but it was removed and the track pretty much goes from full wet to full dry in a few laps now) all served to make the game shallower with each release.

The problem is, as the years went on they ran out of ideas to keep the casuals happy, but the core game was not good enough or detailed enough to keep the F1 fans coming back for more.  Now I'm not talking about being "ultra realistic" here.  Even GP4 is not as realistic as most people think, but the game has depth, good handling, extensive car setup options, telemetry, a weather system that works properly and can be customised for the season, proper damage, tyre wear that's properly simulated, fuel loads that affect the handling realistically, decent AI, mechnical failures, punctures... Basically everything F1 20XX wasn't... I'm not saying that F1 20XX hasn't improved. It has... a bit. The game is reasonably fun for a quick belt around Silverstone on a 25% to 50% race, but I still get more enjoyment out of racing GP4 on 100% races with a current season mod than I do F1 2014 because I find GP4 more interesting. Sure it's looking dated now, but it feels like F1. F1 20XX has always felt like Race Driver with F1 shaped touring cars... When you hit an AI car it feels like you're hitting a solid box, like a closed wheel touring car, even if the contact is wheel to wheel. Open wheel cars often become airbourne when making wheel to wheel contact, but you just don't get this with F1 20XX. The physics simulation has always been really poor. 

Steve Hood often talked a good game, and bigged up his credentials (big F1 fan, made F1 games previous to joining Codemasters, blah, blah) but never delivered on it. Quite frankly, anyone can say they're a big fan of a sport, but it doesn't actually mean you know anything about making a game about it... Yes, he'd worked on F1 games in the past. But he wasn't the project leader on most of them as far as I know. 

What Codemasters need to do, if they're going to continue making F1 games, is listen to what the F1 fans want from the game. Not the casual fans who'd be more interested in COD or GTA and only buy an F1 game when there's nothing else being released or it's in the bargain bin, because they don't matter. Once you run out of gimmicks to add to the game, the people most interested in buying it will be the F1 fans. But if the core game is shallow and fundamentally flawed then they won't buy it. As I said multiple times in the early days of this game series, you wouldn't make a Batman video game aimed at fans of Star Trek so stop making F1 games aimed at GTA and COD players.

Make an F1 game that reflects what the sport is like and has some depth to it, not Grid with some F1 shaped cars and tracks. 

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Anonymous. I sent Steve Hood several links to F1 fan forums where people were discussing the game. I'm talking proper F1 fans here, and lots of them, too. The views they had of the game weren't exactly thrilling. Hood disregarded it as a minority...

So if your main fan base are the minority, who exactly are you making the game for and where are this silent majority? I'll tell you where the "majority" are. In the back of Steve Hoods mind. He made them up when he realised that he couldn't do what Geoff Crammond and Papyrus did and make a good F1 game, so he made excuses!

What we've seen with F1 2014 is a lack of interest. The games too shallow for the main F1 fanbase and it's not got enough bells and whistles to keep the casuals interested. The net result is Steve Hood leaving the series, probably performance based... Let's hope that whoever takes over does a better job, if Codemasters are keeping the license.

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Anonymous. I sent Steve Hood several links to F1 fan forums where people were discussing the game. I'm talking proper F1 fans here, and lots of them, too. The views they had of the game weren't exactly thrilling. Hood disregarded it as a minority...

So if your main fan base are the minority, who exactly are you making the game for and where are this silent majority? I'll tell you where the "majority" are. In the back of Steve Hoods mind. He made them up when he realised that he couldn't do what Geoff Crammond and Papyrus did and make a good F1 game, so he made excuses!

What we've seen with F1 2014 is a lack of interest. The games too shallow for the main F1 fanbase and it's not got enough bells and whistles to keep the casuals interested. The net result is Steve Hood leaving the series, probably performance based... Let's hope that whoever takes over does a better job, if Codemasters are keeping the license.
I agree with some of the things you are saying, but I think there is a dilemma.

The cost of the license is so huge (I guess) that they can only recover that by making the game appeal to the masses. Ultimately CM has to make the game sell as many copies as possible to make it profitable. The sim community I don't believe is big enough to make that happen.  Are there really 1 million+ F1 sim racers out there ? How many serious sim racers are there in the world, 100,000 ? That's still less than 10% of F1s total sales figures ?

To me focussing on sim racing is just a fast way to go out of business if you need 1 million+ sales. That said, I think CM could maybe work a bit harder on incorporating sim-like aspects, because some could be added at low cost, and are easy to flick in and out on the options menu for the casual users. It's also probably true to say a lot of good ideas for game improvements come from sim racers. But the thinks for casual users like say helicopter views which I would like take much more effort to implement. Should CM focus on impleting stuff like this for casual racers, or detailed setups and detailed race weekends for sim users ? They are going to follow where the money is. They have to.

I think there is a difference between what you call a proper F1 fan and a sim racer fan. It's also hard to find the voice of the casual fan, because they are unlikely to come here, or on the sim racing sites. 

I understand why sim racers persevere with the F1 series, because of the nature of the licensing it is the only way they can get an F1 racing experience. But to me these games are always going to be orientated at the average user in order to recover the licensing costs, and if that means reducing the experience so the casual user finds it more enjoyable then that's whats going to happen, irrespective of what sim racers care about. I think CM would deserve more critisism if they claimed F1 was a sim, but they don't. IIRC they say simcade - a simulation with arcade aspects. I think trying to persuade CM to change track on this is like banging your head against a brick wall. To me F1 will always be for mass appeal first and foremost, otherwise it simply isn't business viable. If you are into sim then you have to go and find a program called sim, not simcade. The fact that no sim program for F1 exists is a shame, but maybe thats something to talk to F1 about rather than CM.


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They should start getting with the times though, sim racing is growing and has been over the last few years, you can get a wheel  pretty cheap these days and more and more people are getting them, they can encourage people to get more interested in racing aimed more towards a simulation aspect if they showed the 'casual gamer' it can be much more fun, if they keep pondering to the casual gamer then nothing is going to change because all they are showing them is this sim/arcade version which is just "meh" 

some people don't know what they want, until you show them.
Maybe it is. But what you have to remember is what we can only speculate about they actually know about. My guess is that they know what % of people use pads vs. wheels etc. That they know how many people actually tweak the settings of the car out of the total sales base. My guess is that they can draw a conclusion from that how much of the userbase is hardcore sim dedicated and how  much is casual, and that they apply their development resource/focus accordingly. I don't see any reason why they wouldn't act like this if they have limited resources (everyone does).

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I think Steve Hood and Codemasters forgot that when they're run out of new gimmicks to put into the game (like live the life and classic cars), as happened with F1 2014, the main F1 fanbase are the ones most likely to continue buying the game, but only if you give them a reason to. What we saw with the Codemasters F1 series under Steve Hood was a systematic disregard of the main F1 fanbase in favour of a game that tried to appeal mainly to casual racers. The stripping down of the race weekend, the poor AI, the limited damage, the poor track evolution, the Mario Kart handling, and the fact that there isn't really a dry line that appears when the track goes from wet to dry (they had it in F1 2010 but it was removed and the track pretty much goes from full wet to full dry in a few laps now) all served to make the game shallower with each release.

The problem is, as the years went on they ran out of ideas to keep the casuals happy, but the core game was not good enough or detailed enough to keep the F1 fans coming back for more.  Now I'm not talking about being "ultra realistic" here.  Even GP4 is not as realistic as most people think, but the game has depth, good handling, extensive car setup options, telemetry, a weather system that works properly and can be customised for the season, proper damage, tyre wear that's properly simulated, fuel loads that affect the handling realistically, decent AI, mechnical failures, punctures... Basically everything F1 20XX wasn't... I'm not saying that F1 20XX hasn't improved. It has... a bit. The game is reasonably fun for a quick belt around Silverstone on a 25% to 50% race, but I still get more enjoyment out of racing GP4 on 100% races with a current season mod than I do F1 2014 because I find GP4 more interesting. Sure it's looking dated now, but it feels like F1. F1 20XX has always felt like Race Driver with F1 shaped touring cars... When you hit an AI car it feels like you're hitting a solid box, like a closed wheel touring car, even if the contact is wheel to wheel. Open wheel cars often become airbourne when making wheel to wheel contact, but you just don't get this with F1 20XX. The physics simulation has always been really poor. 

Steve Hood often talked a good game, and bigged up his credentials (big F1 fan, made F1 games previous to joining Codemasters, blah, blah) but never delivered on it. Quite frankly, anyone can say they're a big fan of a sport, but it doesn't actually mean you know anything about making a game about it... Yes, he'd worked on F1 games in the past. But he wasn't the project leader on most of them as far as I know. 

What Codemasters need to do, if they're going to continue making F1 games, is listen to what the F1 fans want from the game. Not the casual fans who'd be more interested in COD or GTA and only buy an F1 game when there's nothing else being released or it's in the bargain bin, because they don't matter. Once you run out of gimmicks to add to the game, the people most interested in buying it will be the F1 fans. But if the core game is shallow and fundamentally flawed then they won't buy it. As I said multiple times in the early days of this game series, you wouldn't make a Batman video game aimed at fans of Star Trek so stop making F1 games aimed at GTA and COD players.

Make an F1 game that reflects what the sport is like and has some depth to it, not Grid with some F1 shaped cars and tracks. 

I agree with what you said except about the casual gamers, surely they make up the majority of F1 2014 buyers, thats why there isn't a dedicated F1 sim, there's not enough hardcore racers to buy it. Most F1 fans are grumpy old men who dont play games. But theres lots of young guys who will buy pretty much any driving game (unfortunately).

So if a company wants to be successful they habve to aim their product towards the masses, i'm sure Codies hate having to dumb it down but money talks

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I'd still like to know where they get their information based on their statistics, how can they know for sure who has a pad, who is a casual gamer etc?  i think it can't accurately be measured, do you remember filling out a questionnaire or survey asking you?  maybe they hang around with clip boards outside the codies building and ask randomers on the street like those annoying charity beggers haha
Anything that can be recorded by the game is presumably sent back from everyone's machines to CM periodically for analysis. That could easily include who's using what kind of controller,  how often they're playing and for how long, and in which game modes with which settings.

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I agree with what you said except about the casual gamers, surely they make up the majority of F1 2014 buyers, thats why there isn't a dedicated F1 sim, there's not enough hardcore racers to buy it. Most F1 fans are grumpy old men who dont play games. But theres lots of young guys who will buy pretty much any driving game (unfortunately).

So if a company wants to be successful they habve to aim their product towards the masses, i'm sure Codies hate having to dumb it down but money talks
Well you'd think that'd be the case, but I happen to know that there are a lot more F1 fans who are gamers than people think. I've followed the sport for almost 40 years and I've met all kinds of different fans and the biggest buzz is about the fact that there isn't a good F1 game.

Codemasters are probably getting their information about what "fans" want from an F1 game from Ecclestone, FOM and the FIA, but they've proven that they're out of touch with what the fans of the sport actually want. Things like Ecclestone saying that young fans aren't needed by the sport because they can't afford Rolex watches, yet on the other hand we've got all these pushes to make the sport more accessible to casual viewers and younger people. Codemasters are probably instructed to make the games to appeal to a wider audience, and the license is rather restrictive, but we're seeing the same push in the real sport with DRS and ERS and marsmallow tyres to spice up the racing and encourage the casual viewer, and what do we have? Falling viewing figures world wide. People want a "purer" F1. No gimmicks and no tricks to spice up the racing. I'll stick my neck out and say that people also want a more realistic racing experience in the game. See, I'm not talking about a game here that needs to be simulation to the Nth degree, as I said Grand Prix 4 wasn't as realistic as people remember, just one that bears more of a resemblance to he sport. Keep the current handling system but add a better damage model, better collision physics that don't feel like you're making contact with a square box when you make contact with the AI drivers, a weather system works and affects the track properly with a proper drying line and different grip levels, and better AI...  Above all else BETTER AI! That's all the game really needs.

People keep saying "but if it was a sim people wouldn't buy it"... How do you really know? Nobody has released an F1 sim since Grand Prix 4, and as I said even that wasn't as realistic as it could have been. Nobody has really got any idea how well an f1 sim would sell because there hasn't been one for a long time. They use examples of things like rFactor, iRacing, Simbin's GTR and GTR2 and say "They don't sell well, so simulations don't sell". Well they are only released on one system, PC, so of course they aren't going to sell as much as a multi-platform release. Then people look at what simulations have been released on console and say "Well Race Pro didn't sell on the Xbox 360". But that's absolutely nothing to do with it being a sim and everything to do with the fact that it was utter garbage... Sure the on track physics were fine, when it was just you and the track, but try racing against the AI. It's the only game I ever played where I drove head on into an AI car and had the AI car carry on as if it I wasn't even there. It was like getting run over by The Hulk. The AI never flinched. The AI cars were glued to the track and drove like the player wasn't even there. Also there was a bug at Road America where the cars coming out of the pits would stay on the pit limiter until they'd reached the racing line on the straight, so anyone coming up the straight at high speed was met with a car moving at 50mph on the racing line and colliding with it was like hitting a solid concrete block. That's why simulations don't sell on consoles, because all the "proper" simulations that have been released for consoles are crap and they're only used to playing simcade games like Forza and GT.

Also it'd be nice if the game had a better system for making you feel like you're in a team. At the moment, no matter who you driver for, it's you vs everyone else including your team mate. I think a system that adjusts your team mates performance compared to your own should be implemented. In my career I've won 9 of the first races driving as Lewis Hamilton's team mate.. he's finished 2nd to me every race and he drives at the same level all the time. Also, at the end of every race, he comes to congratulate me for humiliating him. If he gets a lead, I catch and pass him, but he struggles to pass me if he's behind and quicker. yet he's always "YAY! Well done, Pete!" when the races are over. If Lewis was being as comprehensively beaten by a team mate as he is by me, he wouldn't be all smiles about it. In fact he'd look like someone had just shot his dog. Not only that but he'd try harder in the races to beat me. F1 is about the drama as much as it is the racing. The game needs to find some way to reflect this.

Another thing I don't understand about all this is why is there only one licensed F1 game? Back in the 90's we had multiple F1 games, some were good, some were bad, but everyone was catered for. We had games like Vroom and Super Monaco GP that were aimed at an arcade level and released on consoles and we had games like Grand Prix that were aimed at the simmers and released on PC, and everyone was happy. People got to play the game they wanted and the developers didn't have to pay an exorbitant amount of money for an exclusive license. if the license costs like 60 million for one company to buy it, surely it makes sense to allow three companies to pay 20 million each and develop a sim, an arcade game and something inbetween. That way the FIA and FOM still get their cash and the fans are happy because they get the games they want to play rather than a game that tried to fill all the holes but fails.

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We all should gather together and celebrate that Steve is leaving the F1 project

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I agree with what you said except about the casual gamers, surely they make up the majority of F1 2014 buyers, thats why there isn't a dedicated F1 sim, there's not enough hardcore racers to buy it. Most F1 fans are grumpy old men who dont play games. But theres lots of young guys who will buy pretty much any driving game (unfortunately).

So if a company wants to be successful they habve to aim their product towards the masses, i'm sure Codies hate having to dumb it down but money talks
Well you'd think that'd be the case, but I happen to know that there are a lot more F1 fans who are gamers than people think. I've followed the sport for almost 40 years and I've met all kinds of different fans and the biggest buzz is about the fact that there isn't a good F1 game.

Codemasters are probably getting their information about what "fans" want from an F1 game from Ecclestone, FOM and the FIA, but they've proven that they're out of touch with what the fans of the sport actually want. Things like Ecclestone saying that young fans aren't needed by the sport because they can't afford Rolex watches, yet on the other hand we've got all these pushes to make the sport more accessible to casual viewers and younger people. Codemasters are probably instructed to make the games to appeal to a wider audience, and the license is rather restrictive, but we're seeing the same push in the real sport with DRS and ERS and marsmallow tyres to spice up the racing and encourage the casual viewer, and what do we have? Falling viewing figures world wide. People want a "purer" F1. No gimmicks and no tricks to spice up the racing. I'll stick my neck out and say that people also want a more realistic racing experience in the game. See, I'm not talking about a game here that needs to be simulation to the Nth degree, as I said Grand Prix 4 wasn't as realistic as people remember, just one that bears more of a resemblance to he sport. Keep the current handling system but add a better damage model, better collision physics that don't feel like you're making contact with a square box when you make contact with the AI drivers, a weather system works and affects the track properly with a proper drying line and different grip levels, and better AI...  Above all else BETTER AI! That's all the game really needs.

People keep saying "but if it was a sim people wouldn't buy it"... How do you really know? Nobody has released an F1 sim since Grand Prix 4, and as I said even that wasn't as realistic as it could have been. Nobody has really got any idea how well an f1 sim would sell because there hasn't been one for a long time. They use examples of things like rFactor, iRacing, Simbin's GTR and GTR2 and say "They don't sell well, so simulations don't sell". Well they are only released on one system, PC, so of course they aren't going to sell as much as a multi-platform release. Then people look at what simulations have been released on console and say "Well Race Pro didn't sell on the Xbox 360". But that's absolutely nothing to do with it being a sim and everything to do with the fact that it was utter garbage... Sure the on track physics were fine, when it was just you and the track, but try racing against the AI. It's the only game I ever played where I drove head on into an AI car and had the AI car carry on as if it I wasn't even there. It was like getting run over by The Hulk. The AI never flinched. The AI cars were glued to the track and drove like the player wasn't even there. Also there was a bug at Road America where the cars coming out of the pits would stay on the pit limiter until they'd reached the racing line on the straight, so anyone coming up the straight at high speed was met with a car moving at 50mph on the racing line and colliding with it was like hitting a solid concrete block. That's why simulations don't sell on consoles, because all the "proper" simulations that have been released for consoles are crap and they're only used to playing simcade games like Forza and GT.

Also it'd be nice if the game had a better system for making you feel like you're in a team. At the moment, no matter who you driver for, it's you vs everyone else including your team mate. I think a system that adjusts your team mates performance compared to your own should be implemented. In my career I've won 9 of the first races driving as Lewis Hamilton's team mate.. he's finished 2nd to me every race and he drives at the same level all the time. Also, at the end of every race, he comes to congratulate me for humiliating him. If he gets a lead, I catch and pass him, but he struggles to pass me if he's behind and quicker. yet he's always "YAY! Well done, Pete!" when the races are over. If Lewis was being as comprehensively beaten by a team mate as he is by me, he wouldn't be all smiles about it. In fact he'd look like someone had just shot his dog. Not only that but he'd try harder in the races to beat me. F1 is about the drama as much as it is the racing. The game needs to find some way to reflect this.

Another thing I don't understand about all this is why is there only one licensed F1 game? Back in the 90's we had multiple F1 games, some were good, some were bad, but everyone was catered for. We had games like Vroom and Super Monaco GP that were aimed at an arcade level and released on consoles and we had games like Grand Prix that were aimed at the simmers and released on PC, and everyone was happy. People got to play the game they wanted and the developers didn't have to pay an exorbitant amount of money for an exclusive license. if the license costs like 60 million for one company to buy it, surely it makes sense to allow three companies to pay 20 million each and develop a sim, an arcade game and something inbetween. That way the FIA and FOM still get their cash and the fans are happy because they get the games they want to play rather than a game that tried to fill all the holes but fails.
My guess is the logic goes something like this. If you are interested in playing the game as a sim then you will use a wheel. Since they probably know how many users there are playing on wheel vs. pad they can judge the level of interest in a sim.

The irony is that a lot of people on wheels (I am not one) say F1 2014 is the best F1 game ever on a wheel and they have done a really good job. So its hard for any of us to say that they are not doing anything as respects the sim experience. Of course as someone else pointed out, the game was so good on the wheel it was difficult to control on the pad and the pad control had to be reconfigured.  which of course has led to the pad being faster (alledgedly) and wheel users complaining ! Have you ever had one of those days when you feel that you can't do anything right ?

I think your final paragraph makes sense in your world, but not in a business one. From the F1 side they don't wnat the hassle of dealing with 3x businesses, with 3x the number of lawyers and contract details. From the gamesmaker side they want the exclusivity because that helps them sell more as the only option available.

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One has to admit the fact that working with an engine which is all about flashy physics, zero substance, and where the feedback coming from the wheels, the road, the car etc is practically non-existent, will always lead to something like Steve's F1 games, or the Dirt/Grid games too. I'll give him dat

However, "new gen" coming, new blood to face up new challenges. Not gonna start cryin' I mean

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dirt3joe said:
I think your final paragraph makes sense in your world, but not in a business one. From the F1 side they don't wnat the hassle of dealing with 3x businesses, with 3x the number of lawyers and contract details. From the gamesmaker side they want the exclusivity because that helps them sell more as the only option available.
It worked in the past and there's absolutely no reason why it wouldn't work again. We have 2 football games PES and Fifa, there's more than enough room on the market for more than one F1 game. A bit of competition might actually make the developers try a bit harder to do a better job in order to pull in the buyers.

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I dont get why ppl keep saying the game is to arcade so I wont play it! Ive only done a few laps on r factor so cant compare with pc sims but on the console imo this years game is more sim than any other game on the market (console) ppl bang on about forza and gt but imo they are more arcade than F1! Ive seen racing drivers play these games and not 1 looked any good at it so says it all really to how a GAME will always be. Not saying F1 is sim by any means but if forza and gt are always called sims then I dont get why F1 is called arcade? Btw steve leaving is the best news ive heard since the 2010 release! Imo that guy is the reason nothing has changed (infact features got worse) since the first game so I for one will say dont let the door hit you on the way out steve!   

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vtidixon said:
ppl bang on about forza and gt but imo they are more arcade than F1! 
Lots of laughs

vtidixon said:
Btw steve leaving is the best news ive heard since the 2010 release! Imo that guy is the reason nothing has changed (infact features got worse) since the first game so I for one will say dont let the door hit you on the way out steve!   
Amen bro

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Take a look in after a few months away and what do I find, same old, same old . . . Codemasters is like some flailing animal stuck in a mudhole, refusing to realize that it is game over.

Their talent left the house a long time ago and all we have had for the past few years is embarrassing failure after failure . .no cohesion because of bad or/and incompetent management.
They know it, we know it, so it's time they grew a pair and called it a day . . .

Must fly, The Crew is great fun . . .

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I'm looking forward to the day we learn a new developer has the F1 licence. But for now it's good news to me that the current game designer has had a size 10 up his jacksie. Could be good for the future of CM but I somewhat doubt that in light of the damage caused to the franchise.

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Steve Hood is not the problem. Anybody blaming him is completely short sighted.

The problem is that Codemasters were never really cut out to do F1. The engine and technology is the main problem. You only have to see what happened when 2010 came out. The Ai could not even do consistent laps. The technology was never there in the engine to build good handling. Hence why despite the massive progress it still lacks good feel. That and the enormous amount of bugs in their technology I believe held them back a lot. Such that the team understandably became conservative and there was a lack of new ideas and features.

This is the problem. Steve and the team got a lot out of what they had to work with. It's not a game just for the casuals. There is a lto of stuff in the game that you wouldn't even know about unless you were a real F1 fan. I remember in 2012 they had a handling model that included front slip angles such that it made it so difficult for some people that they thought the game was broken. They made huge progress with the ai and handling but its obvious they were restricted in what they could do.

Plus with an F1 game it is very difficult to breath and look to fix things as you have to produce a game every year. I'm not saying Codemasters do not have problems and yes they really do need to reform their studio but Steve Hood is not the problem with the F1 games. The fact that the franchise seemed to stop going forward suggests deeper problems that is not so easily fixed.

Honestly I think Steve did a good job. And one must not forget the games are not bad by any means, although I do agree when you do see some of the new racing games and even other great AAA titles you can see that things are starting to slip at Codemasters. We will have to see what they come up with in 2015. I do believe if they have a good new engine, noe that is more suited to F1 and not riddled with bugs, the team can do a good job but whether they have that or not we will have to wait and see.

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Magic01 said:
Steve Hood is not the problem. Anybody blaming him is completely short sighted.

The problem is that Codemasters were never really cut out to do F1. The engine and technology is the main problem. You only have to see what happened when 2010 came out. The Ai could not even do consistent laps. The technology was never there in the engine to build good handling. Hence why despite the massive progress it still lacks good feel. That and the enormous amount of bugs in their technology I believe held them back a lot. Such that the team understandably became conservative and there was a lack of new ideas and features.

This is the problem. Steve and the team got a lot out of what they had to work with. It's not a game just for the casuals. There is a lto of stuff in the game that you wouldn't even know about unless you were a real F1 fan. I remember in 2012 they had a handling model that included front slip angles such that it made it so difficult for some people that they thought the game was broken. They made huge progress with the ai and handling but its obvious they were restricted in what they could do.

Plus with an F1 game it is very difficult to breath and look to fix things as you have to produce a game every year. I'm not saying Codemasters do not have problems and yes they really do need to reform their studio but Steve Hood is not the problem with the F1 games. The fact that the franchise seemed to stop going forward suggests deeper problems that is not so easily fixed.

Honestly I think Steve did a good job. And one must not forget the games are not bad by any means, although I do agree when you do see some of the new racing games and even other great AAA titles you can see that things are starting to slip at Codemasters. We will have to see what they come up with in 2015. I do believe if they have a good new engine, noe that is more suited to F1 and not riddled with bugs, the team can do a good job but whether they have that or not we will have to wait and see.
EGO engine exists since... 2007? That's roughly 8 years of development.

They released 5 F1 games over this same engine.

Sorry, but engine limitation doesn't sound like a good excuse for everything.

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8 years of development, but base stays the same. Ego engine physcis are so flashy, and the lack of feedback you get from the car and the road is so big, that you you can't even feel the acceleration; something perfectly noticeable in all tittles under ego, since the first Dirt. You can't develop good physics under this.

Best ego game is Grid, and right after that one, Dirt1. Could have very well been Dirt3 If they had gone serious on that tittle, instead of the lackluster casualized crap they farted after the also lame in terms of content joke called dirt2.  

The clusterfuck of mistakes in CM F1 games, apart from the fact that the obvious engine limitations to recreate something serious, such as some F1 race, lies in the moment they modified the Dirt/Grid engine; right in the moment when the role of the project manager/director/overseer/whatever you wanna call it reaches Its maximum importance, as he's supposed to revert programming mistakes (the later called bugs) and make everyone under his responsibility focus on their jobs and give everything for the project. It is obvious there was a severe lack of this during the modifying process, as the F1 games are known by their countless bugs; but not only for engine limitations, but also for this I'm talking about. Then, you can go and blame your staff as well I guess, even someone in the end he wasn't implying such thing...

Things have gone really well for codies for all these years, as opposed to the usual hashtags some bots try to make you repeat like parrots. Don't fool yourselves scrubs.

Anything interesting left to know from codies right now is whether or not things are really changing this gen. And one of the best ways to know about this is trying their new tech, that is yet to be revealed in f12015, or perhaps dirt4.

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What I don't get, is why not spread the games out a bit. 2-3 years apart and do updates via DLC i.e. Any changes to the rosters and tracks/schedule that way you can put some legit time into advancing each title so people will be more likely to buy each one, and some real advancement could happen.

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Magic01 said:
Steve Hood is not the problem. Anybody blaming him is completely short sighted.

The problem is that Codemasters were never really cut out to do F1. The engine and technology is the main problem. You only have to see what happened when 2010 came out. The Ai could not even do consistent laps. The technology was never there in the engine to build good handling. Hence why despite the massive progress it still lacks good feel. That and the enormous amount of bugs in their technology I believe held them back a lot. Such that the team understandably became conservative and there was a lack of new ideas and features.
Well all this sounds funny to me. The ego engine did not remove a full race weekend did it now! It was the games designer! Not quite so short sighted after all I guess.

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It has to be limit of resources not 1 person. The full race weekend was made and in place, why remove it? I can only think they make list of resources and features and try fit everything in. Maybe it would be different if the Xbox 360 had a blu ray player.
Got a bad feeling for F1 2015. Think there will be features missing that are currently taken for granted

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Magic01 said:
Steve Hood is not the problem. Anybody blaming him is completely short sighted.

The problem is that Codemasters were never really cut out to do F1. The engine and technology is the main problem. You only have to see what happened when 2010 came out. The Ai could not even do consistent laps. The technology was never there in the engine to build good handling. Hence why despite the massive progress it still lacks good feel. That and the enormous amount of bugs in their technology I believe held them back a lot. Such that the team understandably became conservative and there was a lack of new ideas and features.
Well all this sounds funny to me. The ego engine did not remove a full race weekend did it now! It was the games designer! Not quite so short sighted after all I guess.

No you are being short sighted. If you actually look at why the race weekend was removed you will see why and it reinforces my point.

I don't know how much control Steve had at Codemasters. If he had full control I guess you might be right, but if he was just the games designer he did a good job with the tools he had.

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