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Can anyone help how to make a setup where i dont only adjust the wings. I can only do the wings and tyre pressure, but i want to do the others like suspension,suspension geometry and transmission..

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okay I can give you a brief rundown but honestly setups depend on track to track, where you're using it (career/TT/online) ect ect

So, for the purpose of this I'll be focusing on how you setup the car for online, since thats what i mainly do, this will differ if you use career or TT

Suspension geo:
theres not much you need to understand for this, just always use RR/LL (right right left left) this is the most stable setup for all tracks, it gives the most stability and the best tyre wear, you can increase the toe (LL) more the right for example, to give the car better grip, but you'll end up sliding and have worse wear (to clarify, when i say RR/LL i mean the top 2 all the way to the right, bottom 2 all the way to the left.

Suspension:
for the front and rear suspension, this will all depend on the track, for whatever track it is think about the curbs, are they high like baku, or flat like france, this will decide what you run. One big rule of thumb is to never run your rear suspension higher than your front as you want a stable backend on the exit of corners, so for example, at a track like france i run 6-3 suspension, i still want a low rear for stability and generally you never want to go higher than 3 on the rear, and 7 on the front.

anti roll bars: these are more complex and again really depend on the track, its hard to explain how they work unless you just know, in simple terms, your front anti roll bar is all about front end grip, the higher it is, the better your turn in will be (this does not mean it should be 11 all the time, and ill explain why). your rear anti roll bar is more based towards your mid corner grip and how the backend responds to the front, so in most cases its good to keep these 2 settings close together as its more stable (having them the same isnt a good idea either tho) keep them between 2-5 apart for the most part, I'll give you a few examples:
Baku: 9-4
Hungary: 11-7
Australia: 6-4
this setting is all about trial and error and finding something that works for you and feels stable.

ride height:
this one is pretty simple and there's a rule of thumb for this game, 3-4/3-5 is what most people go to, its the most stable, the higher your ride height the worse your straight line speed is, so if you find 3-4 to be too unstable, try 3-5, maybe 3-6 but i wouldnt go further than this, if you can get away with lower ride height (2-4 for example) go for it, just know that through fast corners especially this will feel worse as the car will start to bottom out.

transmission is very simple, your on throttle is how much power is given to the rear wheels essentially (if you use assists then not all of this will apply to you) the higher your on diff, the more potential traction off a corner you'll get, but you will also get more wheelspin, worse tyre and potentially losing the backend out of corners if you're too greedy, more often (assuming you dont use TC) so using 100 all the time isnt good, i find 80 to be a good middle ground, 50 in the wet as you want the least wheelspin possible. your off diff is all about car rotation, the lower it is, the more the car will rotate through the corner, too low and the car will just slide, so again its track specific, but almost all tracks 75 will work fine if you're not sure

It's an essay but you wanted it so there you go, hope it helps, a little note on ballast, depending on your device and confidence, i wouldnt go above 8, 9 takes more setup knowledge to make work, stick to 7 o 8, if you can make a setup from all this advice and make it feel stable, go for it, if you have any other questions let me know.

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okay I can give you a brief rundown but honestly setups depend on track to track, where you're using it (career/TT/online) ect ect

So, for the purpose of this I'll be focusing on how you setup the car for online, since thats what i mainly do, this will differ if you use career or TT

Suspension geo:
theres not much you need to understand for this, just always use RR/LL (right right left left) this is the most stable setup for all tracks, it gives the most stability and the best tyre wear, you can increase the toe (LL) more the right for example, to give the car better grip, but you'll end up sliding and have worse wear (to clarify, when i say RR/LL i mean the top 2 all the way to the right, bottom 2 all the way to the left.

Suspension:
for the front and rear suspension, this will all depend on the track, for whatever track it is think about the curbs, are they high like baku, or flat like france, this will decide what you run. One big rule of thumb is to never run your rear suspension higher than your front as you want a stable backend on the exit of corners, so for example, at a track like france i run 6-3 suspension, i still want a low rear for stability and generally you never want to go higher than 3 on the rear, and 7 on the front.

anti roll bars: these are more complex and again really depend on the track, its hard to explain how they work unless you just know, in simple terms, your front anti roll bar is all about front end grip, the higher it is, the better your turn in will be (this does not mean it should be 11 all the time, and ill explain why). your rear anti roll bar is more based towards your mid corner grip and how the backend responds to the front, so in most cases its good to keep these 2 settings close together as its more stable (having them the same isnt a good idea either tho) keep them between 2-5 apart for the most part, I'll give you a few examples:
Baku: 9-4
Hungary: 11-7
Australia: 6-4
this setting is all about trial and error and finding something that works for you and feels stable.

ride height:
this one is pretty simple and there's a rule of thumb for this game, 3-4/3-5 is what most people go to, its the most stable, the higher your ride height the worse your straight line speed is, so if you find 3-4 to be too unstable, try 3-5, maybe 3-6 but i wouldnt go further than this, if you can get away with lower ride height (2-4 for example) go for it, just know that through fast corners especially this will feel worse as the car will start to bottom out.

transmission is very simple, your on throttle is how much power is given to the rear wheels essentially (if you use assists then not all of this will apply to you) the higher your on diff, the more potential traction off a corner you'll get, but you will also get more wheelspin, worse tyre and potentially losing the backend out of corners if you're too greedy, more often (assuming you dont use TC) so using 100 all the time isnt good, i find 80 to be a good middle ground, 50 in the wet as you want the least wheelspin possible. your off diff is all about car rotation, the lower it is, the more the car will rotate through the corner, too low and the car will just slide, so again its track specific, but almost all tracks 75 will work fine if you're not sure

It's an essay but you wanted it so there you go, hope it helps, a little note on ballast, depending on your device and confidence, i wouldnt go above 8, 9 takes more setup knowledge to make work, stick to 7 o 8, if you can make a setup from all this advice and make it feel stable, go for it, if you have any other questions let me know.
Thanks for the help, this helped me understand making setups. Thank You

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Please help, I’ve played f1 since it came out I’ve got 2018 and I’m really struggling with the 2010 redbull RB6 at hungaroring just can’t keep up with them can set a Q lap off 1:21.207 but struggling to keep up with ther low 1:24 in the race . Please help 

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I am still new to the world of f1 but I've been playing around and learning a good bit about set ups and even made a successful one that I posted for Baku.

I learned that a great place to START your setup is by simply looking at a map of the track- or driving through it once. Take in as much info as possible without calculating everything just yet (take note if the track has tight corners, wide or narrow track limits, barriers or no barriers, big bumps or small bumps, long, plentiful straights, or few, shorter straights. Ultra high speed turns or hairpin corners? All of this is crucial.

I'm a chessplayer, so I think quite a bit about the best Way to go about setting it up- i.e. which areas are most crucial for fast pace.

So essentially I think weight is a great place to start. Do a mental experiment. If you have a heavy back end, you may find the ability to swoop around tight corners while the back end swings around to straighten you up for the exit. Or, maybe for ultra wide high speed corners, it's better to have it slightly more forward, to enhance stability and get the front in turned inward enough to gain plenty of speed and carry it through the curve.

Once you've picked your weight (don't worry about being unstable, pick a good weight for turn radius and use suspension and diff. settings to improve your traction or stability to where acceptable with the weight.) Its finally time to remove as much wing as possible. A good strategy I think is to take off a bit more than the car can handle, making it unstable and slippery- but this can be changed.

So now your car is fast- maybe too fast, and turns very quickly. Now set your suspension settings to find the traction you need to make up for your lack of wing, giving you speed and stability. So for example,  setting a lower rear stability, may give you traction enough for an even lower wing angle. Before you know it you're setting lap records

For wide tracks with flat shoulders a lower roll bar level is good. Think tracks like spain, long and wide curves with plenty of shoulder and no barrier to ram into. This allowed me to pick low suspension and low roll bars for enhanced traction. It made the car roll into the turns and use all the width of the track, and gave me great traction and therefore speed. Lower wing angles let me get a good time

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