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This is why the F1 games never get their bugs fixed

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Kyle Bosman of Gametrailers nailed it in today's episode. Watch those ten minutes; the word "legacy" will come up at which point I had to think of all the F1 games having the same old bugs TO THIS DAY and never getting fixed... this video explains why.

http://www.gametrailers.com/videos/3owakr/the-final-bosman-hakuna-matata--shmakuna-shmatata

It is what it is, people :(

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...
http://www.gametrailers.com/videos/3owakr/the-final-bosman-hakuna-matata--shmakuna-shmatata
...


~8:52 - "...there was someone who said: 'uh, well, not enough of a big deal - the game has to go out. Sorry.' That happened. You know, someone made that decision..."

That's what it boils down to. It's not bad QA. Poor quality is a deliberate decision.

Game creators know the bugs & issues are there, but they've done their calculations & decided that they can still profit by selling poor quality - and they don't deem the return on higher quality to be worth it.

If a 50% cut in quality costs only results in a 20% drop in revenue (this year), they're still ahead 30%.

If a 20% increase in quality investment only yields a 15% increase in revenue (this year), they're behind 5%.

...But that's short-sighted thinking that only (sometimes) works for the current endeavor. The damage done to long-term reputation for poor quality means they'll have a harder time profiting from future endeavors - and typically then only by cutting quality costs even more in a downward spiral until they've driven all customers away. Investment in quality today pays more over time through improved reputation & customer loyalty.

Throughout a game's retail shelf life, the vast majority of its sales typically occur within the first 30-to-60 days. After that, sales (of new copies) usually taper off dramatically, no matter how good the game is. Game companies focus on maximizing what they can get away with in that short release window (when customers have the least information). Customers, however, are often looking for gaming experiences that have sufficient quality to remain fun, functional, & viable for longer than 30-to-60 days. (DLC can get more sales from existing customers, but DLC doesn't usually bring in tons of new customers buying new copies of the game - and paid DLC on top of a broken, poor-quality game is just a slap in the face to customers.)

Companies only invest in quality barely enough to score easy one-night stands, while customers are looking for quality long-term relationships.

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Birmingham throwed their reputation down the toilet way before that article wanted to explain what It is obvious for everyone for a while already.

You can't trust them. Problem is a legion of turds are aware of such lame pratics, but keep purchasing Birmingham bug fests (and other very well knwon bugged out annual franchises) year after year. Not even after what happened this year (the fifth in a row already lol) will prevent some from buying next entry.

It's the people's fault that all of this happens. You can't ask the sheep to have a brain, so It is a lost battle from the beginning.

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I don't for a second believe the F1 games have been almost deliberately bugged.

I think it's a combination of things starting right back to having a poor engine and technology which kept causing problems. And perhaps some poor procedures for ironing out the bugs. And all this is magnified ten fold by having to pump out a game every year. This is not Project Cars where you have the chance to delay your game for six months (and although the official story is for a better window, I've read that others feel it's just as much a case that the game is not ready). They would probably be in violation of contract not to release the game.

However next year is a fresh start and what looks like a chance to move away from the old technology with lots of lessons learned. We'll see where Codemasters and the F1 series is at next year, more so as they have had significantly longer to work on the game to boot.

Plus there is one other crucial fact that must be mentioned. Admittedly I play generally only offline, but I have pretty much encountered zero bugs alteast over the last few editions. I don't know about you guys but if you play the game as it is meant to be played I can barely see any, nothing serious anyway.

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Magic01 said:

However next year is a fresh start and what looks like a chance to move away from the old technology with lots of lessons learned.

This doesn't seem to corroborate such thing though:

T4RG4 said:
 Something that did become apparent over the series were how problematic some of the issues were, just how deep they went. That's something they are actively trying to rectify with the upcoming game and I sincerely hope it works out as planned. I apologise if people have encountered issues. This isn't an excuse, just a brief explanation.

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Haha. I liked around the 45 second mark.

''We;re hearing apologies. We're hearing apologies from game makers. They're being up front and saying we know all this is bad, we're trying to fix it. We're sorry''

Meanwhile at Codemasters

''Bwahahahaha. Apologise to these idiots? Nah. Make the game playable? Nah. Let's just laugh at these mugs, and then laugh even harder over champagne when they all go out and get F1 2015.''

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This is not Project Cars where you have the chance to delay your game for six months (and although the official story is for a better window, I've read that others feel it's just as much a case that the game is not ready).
You're right about that; I'm a junior funder of pCARS and it was a necessary (!) decision to delay the game's release since a lot of core stuff (such as AI) is not ready to go at this point.

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Sadly this type of $$$ or Pride in Service is what defines most of the human race as a virus. We take more than we give till we have exhausted our resources. It doesn’t matter the venue, environment, Trust, Customers, Education, Liberty, you name it and once $$$ has driven something into a corrupt type of thinking anything good becomes a virus and the end is near.

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