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Differential off throttle

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Hi everyone,

I'm basically a beginner in F1 games and have a limited knowledge of F1 in general, but I'd like to explore the setup part of the game

So I read codemaster's description of the different parameters you can change on the car and there's one of them I don't get. Differential is described as the way power is distributed between the rear wheels, and a locked differential gives you an advantage in outright traction. I get what it means "on throttle", that's pretty straightforward, but what power do you have to distribute when you're "off throttle" ? And does the word traction even have sense when you're off throttle ?

Thanks

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1 hour ago, Jocw said:

Hi everyone,

I'm basically a beginner in F1 games and have a limited knowledge of F1 in general, but I'd like to explore the setup part of the game

So I read codemaster's description of the different parameters you can change on the car and there's one of them I don't get. Differential is described as the way power is distributed between the rear wheels, and a locked differential gives you an advantage in outright traction. I get what it means "on throttle", that's pretty straightforward, but what power do you have to distribute when you're "off throttle" ? And does the word traction even have sense when you're off throttle ?

Thanks

The engine is still running when you’re off throttle, therefore still gives power to the rear wheels. Off throttle diff is mainly related to stability off throttle and engine braking.

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Off throttle is essentially how much the tyres spin at different rates without applying the throttle (in a corner). You can make the inner and outer wheel turn more or less differently (that’s why this is called a differential). This can be very useful when you enter a corner without applying the throttle to make the car more turn in (50%) or goes straight (100% with an under steer behavior).

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Ok thanks guys, I think I get it

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