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Wet Weather Setup Advice

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Posted (edited)

We all know wet weather racing is a challenge in the game because of AI grip.  But does anyone have some general setup advice on in game wet weather setups?

From dry to inters, how many clicks of each wing is recommended? (full wet?)

Is raising you're cars ride height in wet conditions seemingly effective?  How many clicks from dry to wet set up for front and rear? (inters and full wet?)

Diff adjustments both on and off throttle?

Anything else you can offer to help a novice (full tc and abs) career mode player?  (I've adjusted AI strength and been ok at some wet races, but still horridly slow and all over at others.)

Edited by brsteg

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First off I will have to mention that I have no experience whatsoever in driving with TC or ABS, so some of my advice might not be applicable to you.

Ride height is super important. In full wet you should in most cases start by maxing it out and gradually lower it if you feel it's better that way. Personally, on most tracks in full wet I have something like 9-11 (front-rear).

Wings depend a lot on the track. If there are long straights you still need a good top speed no matter how wet it is. I'd suggest going high with the rear wing and more conservative with the front - that is to stabilize the rear under acceleration and braking. This might be totally irrelevant with TC and ABS, however.

With differential settings I'm a black sheep as I like to have high on-throttle diff settings. Most people just put it to 50. Again, I have no idea how these work with TC.

You'll also want a soft suspension and low tire pressures.

Anti-roll bar settings are more complicated. Very track and driver dependent. Wouldn't worry about them too much at this point.

In general, I'd advice to practice wet driving in TT or just without other cars in general. You get to concentrate solely on your own performance. At first just focus on staying on the track and slowly build up your speed. With a bit of patience you will be likely to see a several second improvement in your laptimes in just a 2 hour session, and that invested time will be in the bank so to speak. It's tough, sweaty and a lot of fun!

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, janbonator said:

First off I will have to mention that I have no experience whatsoever in driving with TC or ABS, so some of my advice might not be applicable to you.

Ride height is super important. In full wet you should in most cases start by maxing it out and gradually lower it if you feel it's better that way. Personally, on most tracks in full wet I have something like 9-11 (front-rear).

Wings depend a lot on the track. If there are long straights you still need a good top speed no matter how wet it is. I'd suggest going high with the rear wing and more conservative with the front - that is to stabilize the rear under acceleration and braking. This might be totally irrelevant with TC and ABS, however.

With differential settings I'm a black sheep as I like to have high on-throttle diff settings. Most people just put it to 50. Again, I have no idea how these work with TC.

You'll also want a soft suspension and low tire pressures.

Anti-roll bar settings are more complicated. Very track and driver dependent. Wouldn't worry about them too much at this point.

In general, I'd advice to practice wet driving in TT or just without other cars in general. You get to concentrate solely on your own performance. At first just focus on staying on the track and slowly build up your speed. With a bit of patience you will be likely to see a several second improvement in your laptimes in just a 2 hour session, and that invested time will be in the bank so to speak. It's tough, sweaty and a lot of fun!

I will just say that, stability and traction under acceleration is still a huge problem with TC in the wet {when you are used to dry TC} in medium to higher speed corners. (Low speed you often can mat it and it just doesn't go anywhere because of TC not allowing the power transmission).  Braking stability is still quite good IMO with ABS, you just have to watch for the over driving and pushing the nose out, just like dry weather but many times more magnified.

Thank you for the advice.

Edited by brsteg

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1 hour ago, janbonator said:

First off I will have to mention that I have no experience whatsoever in driving with TC or ABS, so some of my advice might not be applicable to you.

Ride height is super important. In full wet you should in most cases start by maxing it out and gradually lower it if you feel it's better that way. Personally, on most tracks in full wet I have something like 9-11 (front-rear).

Wings depend a lot on the track. If there are long straights you still need a good top speed no matter how wet it is. I'd suggest going high with the rear wing and more conservative with the front - that is to stabilize the rear under acceleration and braking. This might be totally irrelevant with TC and ABS, however.

With differential settings I'm a black sheep as I like to have high on-throttle diff settings. Most people just put it to 50. Again, I have no idea how these work with TC.

You'll also want a soft suspension and low tire pressures.

Anti-roll bar settings are more complicated. Very track and driver dependent. Wouldn't worry about them too much at this point.

In general, I'd advice to practice wet driving in TT or just without other cars in general. You get to concentrate solely on your own performance. At first just focus on staying on the track and slowly build up your speed. With a bit of patience you will be likely to see a several second improvement in your laptimes in just a 2 hour session, and that invested time will be in the bank so to speak. It's tough, sweaty and a lot of fun!

Let me just add with the diff; the more open the more the car will roll around the corners (at cost of potential straight line speed), so I do usually open up the off-throttle diff and it feels better.  But I am unable to reason through on-throttle diff, as if I open it up I am concerned the car will rotate too much on throttle and not hook up.  But if I stay at 100% I'm thinking I might be driving too much power too quickly to both rears and losing grip that way.

Back to your advice, probably best to just do a session at a couple tracks in time trial and tinker for feel... and then just make laps to work on my own driving.

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4 hours ago, brsteg said:

I will just say that, stability and traction under acceleration is still a huge problem with TC in the wet {when you are used to dry TC} in medium to higher speed corners. (Low speed you often can mat it and it just doesn't go anywhere because of TC not allowing the power transmission).  Braking stability is still quite good IMO with ABS, you just have to watch for the over driving and pushing the nose out, just like dry weather but many times more magnified.

Thank you for the advice.

My pleasure. I love driving in the wet, and the more people that master it means more people to race against! :classic_happy:

For medium-high speed corners you should find a lot of relief with raising the ride height. What happens is that as the speed and downforce level on the car rises, the closer the car is pushed to the ground. With low ride height in the wet it means the car will start to aquaplane. Under acceleration the weight of the car is towards the rear and that's why the rear loses grip first in such a scenario.

4 hours ago, brsteg said:

Let me just add with the diff; the more open the more the car will roll around the corners (at cost of potential straight line speed), so I do usually open up the off-throttle diff and it feels better.  But I am unable to reason through on-throttle diff, as if I open it up I am concerned the car will rotate too much on throttle and not hook up.  But if I stay at 100% I'm thinking I might be driving too much power too quickly to both rears and losing grip that way.

Back to your advice, probably best to just do a session at a couple tracks in time trial and tinker for feel... and then just make laps to work on my own driving.

On-throttle differential is a lot down to driving preference and technique. Understeer is my cryptonite, so I try to work around it the best I can. In the wet I sometimes use a Senna-esque technique with the throttle - in high-speed corners I battle against understeer with very quick throttle-blips. The idea is to create a rapid succession of short instability to the rear of the car and get it to rotate better. Here's an example from turn 5 in Melbourne:

To summarize my thoughts on on-throttle diff in the wet: On tracks with high-speed corners like Suzuka and Soa (my favorites), where understeer kills your laptimes, I like to have the setting high, around 80 or so, while on street circuits or generally slower tracks I tend to go with low settings. In the clip above I think I have it open at 50.

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