Jump to content
F1 2020 |NEW PATCH AND DRIVER RATINGS | READ ME!!! Read more... ×

Setups (what to use at each track?)

Recommended Posts

After hearing that downforce is important on Hungaroring and Monaco during today's race coverage, I lapped both tracks in my game with higher-downforce setups, which worked well. Of the other tracks, which favor speed and which favor downforce?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
52 minutes ago, TurkeySloth2107 said:

After hearing that downforce is important on Hungaroring and Monaco during today's race coverage, I lapped both tracks in my game with higher-downforce setups, which worked well. Of the other tracks, which favor speed and which favor downforce?

The best thing to do is go into TT and load a setup from someone in the top 10. Try it out and save it for use later when back at that particular track. This is what I do. Some will say that a certain setup will not benefit you because it requires a different driving style then yours. The way I look at it is if that person can do that time with that setup, then I'll make it work. Hasn't failed me yet. I've gained half a second alone on certain tracks by changing to a setup in the top 5 on TT. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, Mike5500 said:

The best thing to do is go into TT and load a setup from someone in the top 10. Try it out and save it for use later when back at that particular track. This is what I do. Some will say that a certain setup will not benefit you because it requires a different driving style then yours. The way I look at it is if that person can do that time with that setup, then I'll make it work. Hasn't failed me yet. I've gained half a second alone on certain tracks by changing to a setup in the top 5 on TT. 

This, and practise.

Only today by chugging in laps on Silverstone in TT I've improved my laptime by 1 second and I know I can find even more time since I'm starting to feel the track and where I can find it. Slowly getting closer to those top times.

Slow tracks like Monaco are extreme in this way, there's time to find in every single part of it. Find a couple of hundreds in one place and a tenth in another and so on and when you do you can gain a few seconds each lap. And the good thing with it being a game, you can test the limits in every corner to find out exactly how fast you can go. You can't do that in a real car.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Speaking as someone who concentrates on Career and dips into TT for a bit of fun, can top TT setups be 'adjusted' for 100% distance Career races and what segments of a TT setup would need to be altered?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Lurtz said:

Speaking as someone who concentrates on Career and dips into TT for a bit of fun, can top TT setups be 'adjusted' for 100% distance Career races and what segments of a TT setup would need to be altered?

I would say if you're doing 100% races, tyre wear will be your first concern. I'm not an expert on it but I would say yes, top TT setups can be altered to fit your races. Research what causes Tyre wear in the game and tweak the setup of that specific area. It could be more downforce or something like softer springs. The rest of the top TT setup stays.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Of course a TT setup and a 100% race setup has to be different but using the former as a template and adjust it will probably give you a good result. Setting up the car is a vital part of F1 so naturally it is, and should be, a vital part of the game as well.

A good balance between a single fast lap and good race pace is what it's all about in the end. Anyone can be fast in one lap, it's something entirely different to be fast for an entire race. The ones getting this right are usually the ones ending up in the top.

This is why I really don't like the 5 lap ranked races. It's not necessarily the best driver that wins.

 

  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Taking a TT setup as a starting template is ok. As good of a starting point as any, really. Just a couple things you should keep in mind.

  • Time Trial is as an "on rails" racing experience as it gets. I mean, you don't have to consider component wear or tyre degradation. You don't ever need to consider taking a corner through anything other than the ideal racing line. No need to disrupt your braking patterns. It is 100% racing to 100% of the car and the circuit capabilities, which comes with all the challenges that racing to the edge entails. Real racing is another kind of beast though. You can't overcook your car and you can't strip your tyres bared. You will need to defend your position thus deviating from your desired racing line both when turning and when on a straight. You will brake late, brake early, throttle away from the apex. You will have to take in account cars coming in hot behind you when you don't have enough ERS juice to complete the lap as you wanted and will have to account for cars defending aggressively to your overtaking attempt. At the end of the day, suspension and transmission settings need to be adjusted the most in my opinion when working from a TT setup. 
  • Steer away from those LEFT/RIGHT setups. Those that put every slider on the minimum or maximum value. That's bonkers. Not that it doesn't work, just that it is taking the above mentioned point to an extreme. Those setups are like "I like red cars. Give me whatever shade of red you have and I'll make do with it". That's not a real racing mentality.  

 

  • Agree 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Lurtz said:

Speaking as someone who concentrates on Career and dips into TT for a bit of fun, can top TT setups be 'adjusted' for 100% distance Career races and what segments of a TT setup would need to be altered?

I've always played 100% distance and mainly offline. TT can be good at times with its setuos. Some of them give you so much pace that you are ok with having to do one stop more. At the end of the day 100% distance allows you to do 2-3 stops and be competitive. Different strategies will balance out. But...in my opinion tyre wear is crucial. This is the way to beat the AI. Tyre wear and confidence. Since early 2019 I'm going extreme with tyre wear friendly setups. They can cost you a bit in qualyfing and early in stints but remember that if you are 0.3 slower on fresh tyres and then 0.5/0.7 faster at the end of stints you're doing great and you have more flexibility in terms of strategy.

You can compensate tyre wear with pace and compensate pace with tyre wear. People tend to forget the second scenario. As said if at the beginning of the race you're slower by 0.3 and then at the end of the first stint you're faster you can pit later and have fresher tyres for the rest of the race. In that moment you'll have both (adjusted) pace and tyre wear in your corners.

There are areas of the setup you'll have to touch from time trial: suspensions, suspensions geometry and tyre pressures. Geometry to reduce mainly wear and pressures to avoid overheating.

Tyre pressures are the true key.

As said in theory you could eat tyres for breakfast but If you overheat, it's over. The last thing you want is being forced to harder compounds by default. Expecially because harder compounds in many cases aren't a choice. If you enter Q3 with a midfield team, for example, you do it with soft tyres so you don't have choice.

The biggest difference between 50% races and 100% races is full fuel load. This is why pressures play a big role. Full fuel load is something that usually users who don't play the full distance tend to forget. As said the last thing you want to experience is being on soft tyres and overheat them in lap 3 or 4 while being passed by cars left and right.

Lower pressures, less aggressive suspensions, less toe and camber (don't be afraid to remove toe and camber, even if the car feels sluggish it'll pay off long term), more downforce.

In free practice test your car with half fuel load and medium compound. This where the car should be comfortable to drive (this is how you test feeling).

Then you can test qualifying speed.

Don't forget to test soft+full fuel load. This is crucial for the race and the strategy. I've lost count of all the races I've started in the past with setups that felt good with half tank and became a nightmare with full tank and softs...

Preset 4 gives you a good starting point for 100% races (in terms of geometry and pressures). It has camber one click from the lowest and minimum rear toe and just a touch of front toe. Pressures three clicks at the rear and two at the front. With close wings and suspensions you won't overheat anywhere (literally). I've used it as the starting point of my base setup.

I've mentioned it to give you an idea of what won't overheat for sure (even in Spain/Hungary/Zandvoort with soft and full tank).

With reduced camber, reduce toe and tyre pressures at 2/3 clicks you won't overheat.

So pay attention to which TT setup to start with. If it has aggressive/extreme suspensions, a lot of camber/toe/high pressures it won't be always bad but it should alarm you...

  • Thanks 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
47 minutes ago, sirio994 said:

I've always played 100% distance and mainly offline. TT can be good at times with its setuos. Some of them give you so much pace that you are ok with having to do one stop more. At the end of the day 100% distance allows you to do 2-3 stops and be competitive. Different strategies will balance out. But...in my opinion tyre wear is crucial. This is the way to beat the AI. Tyre wear and confidence. Since early 2019 I'm going extreme with tyre wear friendly setups. They can cost you a bit in qualyfing and early in stints but remember that if you are 0.3 slower on fresh tyres and then 0.5/0.7 faster at the end of stints you're doing great and you have more flexibility in terms of strategy.

You can compensate tyre wear with pace and compensate pace with tyre wear. People tend to forget the second scenario. As said if at the beginning of the race you're slower by 0.3 and then at the end of the first stint you're faster you can pit later and have fresher tyres for the rest of the race. In that moment you'll have both (adjusted) pace and tyre wear in your corners.

There are areas of the setup you'll have to touch from time trial: suspensions, suspensions geometry and tyre pressures. Geometry to reduce mainly wear and pressures to avoid overheating.

Tyre pressures are the true key.

As said in theory you could eat tyres for breakfast but If you overheat, it's over. The last thing you want is being forced to harder compounds by default. Expecially because harder compounds in many cases aren't a choice. If you enter Q3 with a midfield team, for example, you do it with soft tyres so you don't have choice.

The biggest difference between 50% races and 100% races is full fuel load. This is why pressures play a big role. Full fuel load is something that usually users who don't play the full distance tend to forget. As said the last thing you want to experience is being on soft tyres and overheat them in lap 3 or 4 while being passed by cars left and right.

Lower pressures, less aggressive suspensions, less toe and camber (don't be afraid to remove toe and camber, even if the car feels sluggish it'll pay off long term), more downforce.

In free practice test your car with half fuel load and medium compound. This where the car should be comfortable to drive (this is how you test feeling).

Then you can test qualifying speed.

Don't forget to test soft+full fuel load. This is crucial for the race and the strategy. I've lost count of all the races I've started in the past with setups that felt good with half tank and became a nightmare with full tank and softs...

Preset 4 gives you a good starting point for 100% races (in terms of geometry and pressures). It has camber one click from the lowest and minimum rear toe and just a touch of front toe. Pressures three clicks at the rear and two at the front. With close wings and suspensions you won't overheat anywhere (literally). I've used it as the starting point of my base setup.

I've mentioned it to give you an idea of what won't overheat for sure (even in Spain/Hungary/Zandvoort with soft and full tank).

With reduced camber, reduce toe and tyre pressures at 2/3 clicks you won't overheat.

So pay attention to which TT setup to start with. If it has aggressive/extreme suspensions, a lot of camber/toe/high pressures it won't be always bad but it should alarm you...

Lowering the pressures in this game is a bit too risky. Didn’t David Grecko said that lower tyre pressures give less temperature but more wear, while higher tyre pressures give more temperature but less wear. Therefore, by this effect, I think we need to find a balance in the tyre pressures, as it appears they are so important in this game. I normally do 50% races in preparation for my team as Russell in a Williams, and at time the tyres feel inconsistent, meaning that you have to keep them in the working temperature window. Today in my team at Bahrain, I had no problems with the braking and traction during FP2, which was held in dry and in night time. However, when I went into qualifying with same conditions, I struggled with the braking big time, and I could not brake well, which is absolutely crucial in Bahrain. I did not change the setup from FP2 to Qualifying, and it really caught me by surprise. 
 

In this game, you can get away with stiffer suspension settings in comparison to F1 2019. In regards to tyre pressures, I forgot.

 

Less pressure: Better traction, less temperatures and higher wear.

More pressure: More grip in high speed corners, higher temperature and lesser wear. 
 

Can anyone confirm if these pressure effects are correct?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Krisperfectline yeah tyre pressure is bugging me so much I decided to take it to testing. Did only one GP though, still need to gather more data.

So far I've been using tyre pressure to narrow the gap between left and right side tyres degradation, as it seems to be the main advantage of being able to tweak each tyre individually roughly speaking.

There is a subtle distinction between tyre wear and tyre temperature as it seems to me and it may be a source of confusion. Yes, they're undoubtedly correlated and there are plenty of causation going back and forth, but they're not one and the same.

Lowering the pressure will increase overall tyre wear as the rubber structure will have more give on direction changes and more of a contact patch with the tarmac, but lower pressure will also allow a lower tyre temperature. Higher pressures will reduce overall tyre wear for the same reasoning, but will also raise tyre temperature. And that's the catch: once the tyre exceeds its designated temp range, wear rare goes over the roof.

A good chunk of your tyre degradation will come from the suspension geometry and suspension settings. If there is too wide of a gap between front wheel and rear wheel wear rates, I'd look into tweaking toe and camber before messing with pressures. Those imbalances between left and right tyres on the same axle though I try to equalize by increasing or decreasing pressure depending on how close I am to the temp limit.

It is also worth noting that sometimes it is hard to get a balanced tyre setup by changing one tyre's pressure. You may correct it by subtly tweaking all other 3 tyres. I prefer to run on a worn set than have one gravely offending tyre pulling at my handling.

image.png.48247bdbb7cf83df165a14f42b6a22d2.png

  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Of all the years i have been playing the F1 games on codemasters the one thing i have learnt for my own driving style is not to follow TT set ups or what you see certain you tubers do with their race set ups and copy it.

I found none of them suited my driving style and i was far better off learning how to build a set up around my own style.  I'm not of course suggesting my own set up is faster than an esports drivers set up, it's just i found there is more time to found in a set up you feel confident driving than a set up someone else feels confident driving.

  • Thanks 1
  • Agree 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Was struggling with tyre wear whilst completing the full F2 season of career mode but then discovered “right right left left” on the camber and toe seems to be the best way to go and can get through the tyre sim programme quite easily and don’t have excessive wear during the races.
 

For me I’ve also found that having a very soft suspension (1 or 2 for front and rear) and very low tyre pressures also seems to be my go to when it comes to setups and suiting my driving style. Most of what I tend to adjust from race to race aside from those options are mainly the downforce aero and roll bars balanced with the right brake bias depending on the track. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Krisperfectline said:

Lowering the pressures in this game is a bit too risky. Didn’t David Grecko said that lower tyre pressures give less temperature but more wear, while higher tyre pressures give more temperature but less wear. Therefore, by this effect, I think we need to find a balance in the tyre pressures, as it appears they are so important in this game. I normally do 50% races in preparation for my team as Russell in a Williams, and at time the tyres feel inconsistent, meaning that you have to keep them in the working temperature window. Today in my team at Bahrain, I had no problems with the braking and traction during FP2, which was held in dry and in night time. However, when I went into qualifying with same conditions, I struggled with the braking big time, and I could not brake well, which is absolutely crucial in Bahrain. I did not change the setup from FP2 to Qualifying, and it really caught me by surprise. 
 

In this game, you can get away with stiffer suspension settings in comparison to F1 2019. In regards to tyre pressures, I forgot.

 

Less pressure: Better traction, less temperatures and higher wear.

More pressure: More grip in high speed corners, higher temperature and lesser wear. 
 

Can anyone confirm if these pressure effects are correct?

It is correct that you have to find a balance but low pressures are the starting point. You can go with higher pressures in many tracks but it's the definition of high pressures that has to be clarified. In 100% distance races you'll never go over certain numbers unless it's very safe. With low pressures the biggest problem you'll encounter is in wet weather. Medium/low numbers struggle a lot with temperatures in wet tracks. But in the dry you should be able to keep them in the window. The problem in this game is that when we talk about setups it's all relative stiffer suspensions isn't 8-11, higher ride height isn't 8-10, the same with pressures...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, SIMRACER123 said:

Of all the years i have been playing the F1 games on codemasters the one thing i have learnt for my own driving style is not to follow TT set ups or what you see certain you tubers do with their race set ups and copy it.

I found none of them suited my driving style and i was far better off learning how to build a set up around my own style.  I'm not of course suggesting my own set up is faster than an esports drivers set up, it's just i found there is more time to found in a set up you feel confident driving than a set up someone else feels confident driving.

This is so true. I've used many of their setups. Sometimes I'm shocked by the combinations they come up with. Numbers that I would never even consider...that make no sense...but work in the game. For example last year you could use 1-3 ride height at Monaco, something that I would have never tested or thought about if it wasn't for esports youtubers and streamers. Didn't use it offline because I go for realism there but online some of their concepts helped.

If you want a performance based setup YouTube is a good place to go (along with TT and leaderboards).

But it is important to remember their starting point. They do come close to world records with default or almost default setups.

I would say once you know your style is easy to filter setups even online and on TT.

  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, SIMRACER123 said:

Of all the years i have been playing the F1 games on codemasters the one thing i have learnt for my own driving style is not to follow TT set ups or what you see certain you tubers do with their race set ups and copy it.

I found none of them suited my driving style and i was far better off learning how to build a set up around my own style.  I'm not of course suggesting my own set up is faster than an esports drivers set up, it's just i found there is more time to found in a set up you feel confident driving than a set up someone else feels confident driving.

I was asking so I can build my own setups, not so I can copy one that may not suit my driving style. I tried copying a few on various tracks, which didn't work out well. Thus, I'd still like a breakdown of which tracks favor downforce and which favor speed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, TurkeySloth2107 said:

 Thus, I'd still like a breakdown of which tracks favor downforce and which favor speed.

 

Pirelli have this (excluding Zandvoort and Hanoi):

https://f1bythenumbers.com/2019-f1-season-tracks-according-to-pirelli/

 

5 is high downforce, 1 is low.

image.png

 

Hanoi is probably a 3, that final sector needs a decent amount of downforce even with all the straights elsewhere on the circuit. Maybe a 2 since Azerbaijan has a similar mix.

 

Zandvoort is probably a 4, very technical similar to Hungary.

  • Thanks 3
  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As part of my f1 journey from console pad player medium assists a few years ago to going no assists apart from gears to a wheel then no assists atall setups is my next step.

I woud like to know what temp window the different compounds have to be in if anyone knows.

I know David said 85 to 100 is that all tyres I would like to know which tyres specifically. Id imagine harder compounds have a lower temp window?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, PJTierney said:

 

Pirelli have this (excluding Zandvoort and Hanoi):

https://f1bythenumbers.com/2019-f1-season-tracks-according-to-pirelli/

 

5 is high downforce, 1 is low.

image.png

 

Hanoi is probably a 3, that final sector needs a decent amount of downforce even with all the straights elsewhere on the circuit.

Zandvoort is probably a 4, very technical similar yo Hungary.

Thanks, PJ.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, PJTierney said:

 

Pirelli have this (excluding Zandvoort and Hanoi):

https://f1bythenumbers.com/2019-f1-season-tracks-according-to-pirelli/

 

5 is high downforce, 1 is low.

image.png

 

Hanoi is probably a 3, that final sector needs a decent amount of downforce even with all the straights elsewhere on the circuit. Maybe a 2 since Azerbaijan has a similar mix.

 

Zandvoort is probably a 4, very technical similar to Hungary.

Values are pretty accurate in game too. I think in the game you can come away with less downforce at Mexico, Russia, Brazil and Australia (Britain too) compared to downforce 4 of Pirelli.

But it has a lot to do with how parts of those tracks are built in the game. Mexico is the first example that comes to my mind: S2's esses are way more difficult in real life and altidute is a factor...

Edited by sirio994
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, sirio994 said:

I've always played 100% distance and mainly offline. TT can be good at times with its setuos. Some of them give you so much pace that you are ok with having to do one stop more. At the end of the day 100% distance allows you to do 2-3 stops and be competitive. Different strategies will balance out. But...in my opinion tyre wear is crucial. This is the way to beat the AI. Tyre wear and confidence. Since early 2019 I'm going extreme with tyre wear friendly setups. They can cost you a bit in qualyfing and early in stints but remember that if you are 0.3 slower on fresh tyres and then 0.5/0.7 faster at the end of stints you're doing great and you have more flexibility in terms of strategy.

You can compensate tyre wear with pace and compensate pace with tyre wear. People tend to forget the second scenario. As said if at the beginning of the race you're slower by 0.3 and then at the end of the first stint you're faster you can pit later and have fresher tyres for the rest of the race. In that moment you'll have both (adjusted) pace and tyre wear in your corners.

There are areas of the setup you'll have to touch from time trial: suspensions, suspensions geometry and tyre pressures. Geometry to reduce mainly wear and pressures to avoid overheating.

Tyre pressures are the true key.

As said in theory you could eat tyres for breakfast but If you overheat, it's over. The last thing you want is being forced to harder compounds by default. Expecially because harder compounds in many cases aren't a choice. If you enter Q3 with a midfield team, for example, you do it with soft tyres so you don't have choice.

The biggest difference between 50% races and 100% races is full fuel load. This is why pressures play a big role. Full fuel load is something that usually users who don't play the full distance tend to forget. As said the last thing you want to experience is being on soft tyres and overheat them in lap 3 or 4 while being passed by cars left and right.

Lower pressures, less aggressive suspensions, less toe and camber (don't be afraid to remove toe and camber, even if the car feels sluggish it'll pay off long term), more downforce.

In free practice test your car with half fuel load and medium compound. This where the car should be comfortable to drive (this is how you test feeling).

Then you can test qualifying speed.

Don't forget to test soft+full fuel load. This is crucial for the race and the strategy. I've lost count of all the races I've started in the past with setups that felt good with half tank and became a nightmare with full tank and softs...

Preset 4 gives you a good starting point for 100% races (in terms of geometry and pressures). It has camber one click from the lowest and minimum rear toe and just a touch of front toe. Pressures three clicks at the rear and two at the front. With close wings and suspensions you won't overheat anywhere (literally). I've used it as the starting point of my base setup.

I've mentioned it to give you an idea of what won't overheat for sure (even in Spain/Hungary/Zandvoort with soft and full tank).

With reduced camber, reduce toe and tyre pressures at 2/3 clicks you won't overheat.

So pay attention to which TT setup to start with. If it has aggressive/extreme suspensions, a lot of camber/toe/high pressures it won't be always bad but it should alarm you...

Thanks sirio994. I appreciate the explanations. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, sirio994 said:

It is correct that you have to find a balance but low pressures are the starting point. You can go with higher pressures in many tracks but it's the definition of high pressures that has to be clarified. In 100% distance races you'll never go over certain numbers unless it's very safe. With low pressures the biggest problem you'll encounter is in wet weather. Medium/low numbers struggle a lot with temperatures in wet tracks. But in the dry you should be able to keep them in the window. The problem in this game is that when we talk about setups it's all relative stiffer suspensions isn't 8-11, higher ride height isn't 8-10, the same with pressures...

You can go higher pressures in many tracks? I tried to race a 50% on the default setup yesterday at Suzuka as a test in Bottas’ Mercedes, and the tyres were overheating so quickly, particularly both front tyres. After 3 laps on softs, the fronts were at 107 degrees. In previous games with default setup, I have never had issues at Suzuka when it comes to tyre wear. I guess now, we will need to balance them. I am not too worried about that. I mainly run the pressures two clicks or three clicks to the left of the default one since I am a pad user, and I will change them based on my feel. I am at Vietnam now in my team, and I will try to increase the front pressures by one click compared to my setup, as I have been keeping the front tyre temperature at 90-94 degrees during my tests with Russell in the Williams. It feels like maybe I could get away with more pressure at the front, as it would give me better grip, and the temperature increase may not be higher than 100 degrees. 
 

What shocked me even more, was that in Australia 50% race, I could not switch on the Medium tyre at the first stint of the race, and on the same conditions, I had no problem driving with the soft or hard tyre. Whenever I used the medium tyre, I would get understeer and I would be sliding for the entire first stint. Whereas on the soft or hard tyre, I could drive normally without any problems. 
 

On 7/20/2020 at 3:22 PM, marioho said:

@Krisperfectline yeah tyre pressure is bugging me so much I decided to take it to testing. Did only one GP though, still need to gather more data.

So far I've been using tyre pressure to narrow the gap between left and right side tyres degradation, as it seems to be the main advantage of being able to tweak each tyre individually roughly speaking.

There is a subtle distinction between tyre wear and tyre temperature as it seems to me and it may be a source of confusion. Yes, they're undoubtedly correlated and there are plenty of causation going back and forth, but they're not one and the same.

Lowering the pressure will increase overall tyre wear as the rubber structure will have more give on direction changes and more of a contact patch with the tarmac, but lower pressure will also allow a lower tyre temperature. Higher pressures will reduce overall tyre wear for the same reasoning, but will also raise tyre temperature. And that's the catch: once the tyre exceeds its designated temp range, wear rare goes over the roof.

A good chunk of your tyre degradation will come from the suspension geometry and suspension settings. If there is too wide of a gap between front wheel and rear wheel wear rates, I'd look into tweaking toe and camber before messing with pressures. Those imbalances between left and right tyres on the same axle though I try to equalize by increasing or decreasing pressure depending on how close I am to the temp limit.

It is also worth noting that sometimes it is hard to get a balanced tyre setup by changing one tyre's pressure. You may correct it by subtly tweaking all other 3 tyres. I prefer to run on a worn set than have one gravely offending tyre pulling at my handling.

image.png.48247bdbb7cf83df165a14f42b6a22d2.png

For what track is this? Are you on a pad or on a wheel? Did you pit 3 times based on that graphic?
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, TurkeySloth2107 said:

Thanks, PJ.

This is extremely useful. I believe for Hanoi, you can get away with a low downforce setup, but you will need to get the lines right in the final sector, without stressing the tyres too much. A big thank you to you guys for making the track. It is so fun and satisfying to drive. 
 

How is Monza 5 on tyre stress? Is it because of the braking zones? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Krisperfectline Sochi. Pad. I do 25% races and the only purpose of the test wast to single out the role of try pressure while driving consistently after I had settled on a setup, so I wasn't specially concerned with keeping wear low, so it was a single stop for me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Krisperfectline said:

You can go higher pressures in many tracks? I tried to race a 50% on the default setup yesterday at Suzuka as a test in Bottas’ Mercedes, and the tyres were overheating so quickly, particularly both front tyres. After 3 laps on softs, the fronts were at 107 degrees. In previous games with default setup, I have never had issues at Suzuka when it comes to tyre wear. I guess now, we will need to balance them. I am not too worried about that. I mainly run the pressures two clicks or three clicks to the left of the default one since I am a pad user, and I will change them based on my feel. I am at Vietnam now in my team, and I will try to increase the front pressures by one click compared to my setup, as I have been keeping the front tyre temperature at 90-94 degrees during my tests with Russell in the Williams. It feels like maybe I could get away with more pressure at the front, as it would give me better grip, and the temperature increase may not be higher than 100 degrees. 
 

What shocked me even more, was that in Australia 50% race, I could not switch on the Medium tyre at the first stint of the race, and on the same conditions, I had no problem driving with the soft or hard tyre. Whenever I used the medium tyre, I would get understeer and I would be sliding for the entire first stint. Whereas on the soft or hard tyre, I could drive normally without any problems. 
 

For what track is this? Are you on a pad or on a wheel? Did you pit 3 times based on that graphic?
 

Which default setup? Balance 3 is overheating friendly to a point that doesn't make sense. It has been reported since the Beta. It's unnecessary understeery. At Suzuka there's not a lot to do. It was already a low pressure track last year...

  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Hello guys,

could someone of you do me (a beginner) a favour? I really don't need super sofisicated setups, because it makes no sense for me anyway. But a least I could choose the most appropriate default setup for a given track. You know we have:

  - max downforce (MD = Preset 1)
  - high downforce (HD = Preset 2)
  - med. downforce/med. speed (MDS = Preset 3)
  - high speed (HS = Preset 4)
  - max speed (MS = Preset 5)

Can you fill the following list?

  - Australia: 
  - Bahrain: 
  - Vietnam: 
  - China: 
  - Netherlands: 
  - Spain: 
  - Monaco: MD
  - Aserbaischan: MD
  - Canada: 
  - France: 
  - Austria: 
  - Great Britain: 
  - Hungary: 
  - Belgium: 
  - Italy: 
  - Singapur: MD
  - Russia: 
  - Japan: 
  - USA: 
  - Mexico: 
  - Brasil: 
  - Abu Dhabi: 

Many Thanks!

 

Edited by vTeritron

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×