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Learning Curve

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6 minutes ago, marioho said:

Haha just the other day I was listening to a interview with former F1 driver Eddie Cheever and he went on a bit about the differences between it and Indy. Different sports that require different set of skills from the drivers to deal with different demands, as well as different features in the cars to deal with different circumstances. 

It is one thing to deal with a canted oval track surrounded by a uninviting concrete wall while driving under 2-3G forces on you. Another whole different package to speed through a 12-16 turns track with varying width and angles while feeling spikes of over 5G forces on your neck. What use is trail braking on an oval?

And I'm not downplaying how cool or skill-demanding indy is. That's all to say they're very, very different. Cheever talks about it, a bunch of F1 drivers try to give indy a go after retiring from the former aiming for that tempting Triple Crown or to just keep on racing and they just back off after a while. It is simply not the same. The tension of having that solid barrier on your side with no run off is what he heavily emphasized as being a no-joke.   

Not to talk about that as-old-as-the-grave debate of "what is faster, indy or F1". Broadly speaking, full throttle speed over a given distance? A F1 car will fall behind a Indy one as it just cannot maintain that top speed indefinitely. ERS will run out of juice. Sprinkle a few corners on the path though and that's a bye bye indy as F1 cars are designed to swallow and slingshot out of corners like hot knife on butter.

Indy and F1 are not interchangeable. 

Edit: Oh FFS there comes @Ultra3142 undercutting me again! At this point I may as well just propose a joint venture with you.

The Wall is absolutely a merciless god

JR Hildebrand crashed from the lead on the last lap of the 500, 2011

500crash.gif.fe22d90fefacfb43c1111389d838755c.gif

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Indycar hit over 4 g every few seconds at some tracks.  Sustained g's.  Obviously F1 is the pinnacle of racing but it's not as exciting as it used to be.

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1 hour ago, KNT2011 said:

While I think a track like Martinsville really lacks a lot of appeal and is certainly one for the short course hardcore, a race at Bristol is an absolute blast given the huge banking, total lack of track space, and "it's just a flesh wound!" mentality as crews send their battered cars out with tape to replace their entire front assembly. It's a race I think should be experienced at least once by any fan of motorsports. 

And you can't argue with the sheer scale of the setting

Bristol-Motor-Speedway-Night-Race.thumb.jpg.dcf80a8929060b8ce43ca14dc4614180.jpg

 

Whenever I see an oval course, the only thing I can think about is the Circus Maximus of ancient Rome and their chariot racing.

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Just one of many curious similarities between the Roman and American empires. The same happens when seeing an aerial shot of a football (soccer) stadium. Just like the Colosseum. Bread and Circus hasn't changed much, has it? We still do love our circuses. 

 

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Well, there is a reason why Bristol Motor Speedway's nickname is the "The Last Great Colosseum" 🙂 

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4 minutes ago, janbonator said:

Whenever I see an oval course, the only thing I can think about is the Circus Maximus of ancient Rome and their chariot racing.

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Just one of many curious similarities between the Roman and American empires. The same happens when seeing an aerial shot of a football (soccer) stadium. Just like the Colosseum. Bread and Circus hasn't changed much, has it? We still do love our circuses. 

 

While the aesthetics are the leading factor, you could of course point at any major stadium and say the same, for whatever sport. 

Bristol above, tags itself as 'The Last Great Coliseum', so at least in that sense, they were going for that look!

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Posted (edited)
6 minutes ago, KNT2011 said:

While the aesthetics are the leading factor, you could of course point at any major stadium and say the same, for whatever sport. 

Bristol above, tags itself as 'The Last Great Coliseum', so at least in that sense, they were going for that look!

Yes indeed. Oval racing just has such a clear historic predecessor, and as a history enthusiast I find it very nice. Gladiator sports and bloodshed have been toned down over the years, but the essence and danger of stadium racing is still the same. Speeds have increased and horsepower is mechanical instead of biological, but the same core danger of death is still present.

The Last Great Hippodrome would've been more accurate, but Colosseum is sure more catchy!

Edited by janbonator

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1 hour ago, janbonator said:

Gladiator sports and bloodshed have been toned down over the years [...]

I beg to respectfully semi-disagree. Exhibit A, exhibit B, exhibit C. And D, while we're at it because why not?

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4 minutes ago, marioho said:

I beg to respectfully semi-disagree. Exhibit A, exhibit B, exhibit C. And D, while we're at it because why not?

Amazing move by DJ in C there, still not over that, phenomenal

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I had little trouble getting around Silverstone before switching to a manual gearbox. During that time, I may have gotten around Hungaroring with a bit of difficulty. However, with manual gears, I've, effectively, pitched a tent on Hungaroring with how easily I can drive it. Yet, I've had immense trouble with Slverstone since the change, completing very few clean laps there. Have any of you had similar experience right after switching to manual? 

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4 hours ago, TurkeySloth2107 said:

I had little trouble getting around Silverstone before switching to a manual gearbox. During that time, I may have gotten around Hungaroring with a bit of difficulty. However, with manual gears, I've, effectively, pitched a tent on Hungaroring with how easily I can drive it. Yet, I've had immense trouble with Slverstone since the change, completing very few clean laps there. Have any of you had similar experience right after switching to manual? 

It's just going to be practice mate. Hungary is a very rhythmic track and has a lot of slow corner entries, allowing you plenty of time to drop down the gears during braking and accelerate out in a smooth motion. Silverstone is not this at all, as you know already, super fast entries and hard braking into several corners as well as the need to carry high speed through into a fast exit. It's very tricky in terms of managing your gears as there isn't any real rhythm to it, other than the vaguely symmetrical halves of the circuit. 

Only tip I'd have is you can typically get through most of its corners in a higher gear than you think or may have picked up from tracks like Hungary, so you shouldn't ever have to drop all the way down. 

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4 hours ago, TurkeySloth2107 said:

I had little trouble getting around Silverstone before switching to a manual gearbox. During that time, I may have gotten around Hungaroring with a bit of difficulty. However, with manual gears, I've, effectively, pitched a tent on Hungaroring with how easily I can drive it. Yet, I've had immense trouble with Slverstone since the change, completing very few clean laps there. Have any of you had similar experience right after switching to manual? 

I suspect what you're experiencing doesn't relate to the switch to manual gears.

I think Hungary was the track where I essentially learned to drive with manual gears. I briefly tried no assists at all at Austria but that was far too much for me to cope with all at once so I then decided to stick to medium traction control and ABS on whilst learning manual gears, and then switched to learning Hungary to follow the current F1 calendar. Silverstone was the second track I learned to drive with manual gears, again following the race calendar. I didn't though drive either with automatic gears to compare.

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Posted (edited)

I've resorted to my old restarting tactic there because most of the laps have been Abbey overruns with either complete stops or overcorrections afterwards. Otherwise, Club's the main issue.

Edited by TurkeySloth2107

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