Jump to content
F1 2020 |PATCH 1.13 NOW LIVE | READ ME!!! Read more... ×

General race setup

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

Sure doesn't seem like you do. @Ultra3142 has been patiently and politely pointing it out to you. Maybe it's a language barrier but you're coming off as condescending - which is a problem in itself, but even worse when you're baseless on your arguing.

The outside tyre will always wear out faster than the inside tyre as it has to bear a greater load when cornering. Mid and high speed corners are the worse offenders as the latitudinal G forces just exacerbate the imbalance.

One way to cope with that is to increase the tyre pressure to protect the tyre from the increased wear. Sure, it will also raise the tyre temperature, but as long as it doesn't exceed the operating window for that compound you'll not be getting any extra wear from it. Increasing the pressure protects the tyre by making it more rigid, more structurally sound. It won't flex as much during corners.

 

 

 

Edited by marioho
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, marioho said:

Maybe it's a language barrier

google translator, because there is no Russian technical support.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's frustrating. I'm running an online league with my friend. We're just two people. I don't know if it's a bug or what. My qualifying time in Hanoi is 1:40. In training I do 1:45 on soft tires with fuel for 28 laps (50% distance). In the race, however, my lap times are 1:51 or 1:52 and I simply can't go faster. It was the same in Australia and Bahrain. The gap between training and race was 3-4 sec per lap even though the fuel load was the same.

This is also why I started this thread. If it's no bug, I'm doing something badly wrong. Any idea?  

PS: My friend doesn't have this issue. His lap times are similar to what he does in training. 

Edited by SixtoRodriguez

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You'll have to be a little more generous on the details here, pal.

Driving style & consistency, could be. Could also be your setup not being the best one around for your tyres + your driving. Could be component wear + your driving. Tyre wear data, race strategy, when you pit and footage of a regular lap. These could all help.

Other than that we're just shooting in the dark here.

But a bug to affect things like this I never heard of. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, marioho said:

You'll have to be a little more generous on the details here, pal.

Driving style & consistency, could be. Could also be your setup not being the best one around for your tyres + your driving. Could be component wear + your driving. Tyre wear data, race strategy, when you pit and footage of a regular lap. These could all help.

Other than that we're just shooting in the dark here.

But a bug to affect things like this I never heard of. 

This is the setup I used for the race:

Team: Mc Laren

Lap Time: 1:40.100 (Q3) / ~ 1:51 on soft tyres with fuel for 28 laps in the race

Race Mode: League race 50%

Weather: Dry

Controller Type: Thrustmaster T300

Aerodynamics
Front Wing Aero: 5
Rear Wing Aero: 8

Transmission
Differential Adjustment On Throttle: 50%
Differential Adjustment Off throttle: 60%

Suspension Geometry 
Front Camber: -2.50
Rear Camber: -1.00
Front Toe: 0.05
Rear Toe: 0.20

Suspension
Font Suspension: 1
Rear Suspension: 8
Front Anti-Roll Bar: 3
Rear Anti-Roll Bar: 8
Front Ride Height: 2
Rear Ride Height: 3

Brakes
Brake Pressure: 90%
Front Brake Bias: 54%

Tyres
Front Right Tyre Pressure: 21.0psi
Front Left Tyre Pressure: 21.0psi
Rear Right Pressure: 19.5psi
Rear Left Tyre Pressure: 19.5psi

I struggled big time in the third sector. Tyres were overheating all the time. This wasn't the case in training with same load (fuel). I was going 3-4 sec faster. I have no explanation for this. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks a little funky on the suspension side of things as front springs, rear springs and front anti roll bar all cater to a oversteering car with only rear anti roll bar attenuating that on corner exits. That should not be a big problem though as long as you drive around that with your style.

The tyre pressures seem way too low for Hanoi, though. That will spend your tyres really quick. And there is nothing in the suspension geometry to optimize contact patch as it is the standard LEFT/RIGHT time trial setup there. 

I don't know, mate. Would still be interested in see a video as differences of this magnitude, in the seconds, are usually due to the actual driving. 

Tyre performance relative to tyre wear is not linear too, you should have it in mind. There is a point where your tyre will be shot, a cliff where they drop in performance abruptly. If your setup is not accounting for the uneven wear of the track and is not the most balanced setup out there, one corner or a whole side of your car will have shot tyres before the other and will only aggravate the issue of uneven wear.

I don't think you should be able to run far on those pressures in Hanoi. That looks like a time trial setup to me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/31/2020 at 8:54 PM, marioho said:

Sure doesn't seem like you do. @Ultra3142 has been patiently and politely pointing it out to you. Maybe it's a language barrier but you're coming off as condescending - which is a problem in itself, but even worse when you're baseless on your arguing.

The outside tyre will always wear out faster than the inside tyre as it has to bear a greater load when cornering. Mid and high speed corners are the worse offenders as the latitudinal G forces just exacerbate the imbalance.

One way to cope with that is to increase the tyre pressure to protect the tyre from the increased wear. Sure, it will also raise the tyre temperature, but as long as it doesn't exceed the operating window for that compound you'll not be getting any extra wear from it. Increasing the pressure protects the tyre by making it more rigid, more structurally sound. It won't flex as much during corners.

 

 

 

Spain, career "my team", starting from 11th place.
started on a medium and after 8 laps the wear is the same as in the screenshot.

Now the questions:
1. Should I change the settings in Spain, reduce the pressure on the left wheels ?
2. The given moment the left wheels overheat, is this a feature of the track or incorrect alignment ?
3. If I reduce the pressure on the left wheels, will this affect the steering ?

1541138215_F12020Screenshot2020_09.03-16_15_23_88.png.c2f3a2a9f3aa34bcb9ba8430976468c4.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@MilligramSmile

1. Not able to tell because we can't be sure from these screenshots alone if the tyre wear is coming from having too flexible tyres or too inflated ones. Unfortunately the game doesn't inform you of your average tyre temperature, only the current temperature. If this screenshot was taken right after a right turn, it would explain the front left tyre being a bit higher.

2. It is not overheating yet as it is still colored green. But your question is answered with two "yes": yes, it is a feature of the track as Spain has a bunch of high speed corners to the right, which will overload the left tyres; and yes, it could be incorrect alignment as you can use your setup to decrease this gap in wear between left and right tyres

3. Depends on how much you decrease. Could impact your steering, making the car a little sluggish to turn, but not much. But we don't know if the proper fix would be decreasing the pressures. 

  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@MilligramSmile why don't you try one of the recommended setups I linked to that you laughed at for having uneven tyre pressures and see if the do any better? In terms of changes to how the car feels you're going to have to try something and see what you think anyway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My approach to the settings is this: I write on paper about 10 options taken from sites, videos, friends and past F1 games.
I try to show fast time in time trial on these variants. I then try to improve the fastest option.
Then I use this option everywhere: in my career, online and even in the rain))))

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, MilligramSmile said:

@Ultra3142 I tried many different settings and found those that suit me and I drive quickly on them ...

My suggestion was specifically because you were laughing at the others before for having unequal tyre pressures. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Ultra3142 said:

My suggestion was specifically because you were laughing at the others before for having unequal tyre pressures. 

It should, however, be mentioned that tyre pressure will always be unequal because the fronts min out 1.5 psi higher than the backs. Thus, even with the most similar pressures, there'll be a minimum difference of -0.3 psi (three ticks more on the backs) or 0.1 psi (four ticks more on the backs).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/3/2020 at 1:46 PM, marioho said:

Looks a little funky on the suspension side of things as front springs, rear springs and front anti roll bar all cater to a oversteering car with only rear anti roll bar attenuating that on corner exits. That should not be a big problem though as long as you drive around that with your style.

The tyre pressures seem way too low for Hanoi, though. That will spend your tyres really quick. And there is nothing in the suspension geometry to optimize contact patch as it is the standard LEFT/RIGHT time trial setup there. 

I don't know, mate. Would still be interested in see a video as differences of this magnitude, in the seconds, are usually due to the actual driving. 

Tyre performance relative to tyre wear is not linear too, you should have it in mind. There is a point where your tyre will be shot, a cliff where they drop in performance abruptly. If your setup is not accounting for the uneven wear of the track and is not the most balanced setup out there, one corner or a whole side of your car will have shot tyres before the other and will only aggravate the issue of uneven wear.

I don't think you should be able to run far on those pressures in Hanoi. That looks like a time trial setup to me.

We drove China this weekend. I struggled with overheating M and S tyres in training so I lowered the pressure again (third lowest setting possible). This helped me a lot and I was able to basically run the same lap times in the race as in training. I now think my tyres were simply overheating in Hanoi despite the low pressure. I'm surprised you say the pressure is too low for Hanoi. I always read low pressure is the way to go in F1 2020. My overall impression is the setup in F1 2020 is much more fragile / essential than ever before. By the way, I used PJ's setup in China and it worked great for me. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, SixtoRodriguez said:

I'm surprised you say the pressure is too low for Hanoi. I always read low pressure is the way to go in F1 2020.

Not only on F1 2020, but on real F1 too. All teams generally want to go with as low pressures as possible. Every weekend Pirelli publishes a document like this, with the minimum tye pressures and maximum camber:

811605590_UK2020B.thumb.jpg.a2b6560c268128ec5c634d9594521ad4.jpg

That's for safety and tyre longevity reasons, not performance. If let by the teams will, they would be running much less pressurized tyres.

You need to bear in mind that tyre pressures also have to do with suspension geometry. You change the suspension geometry to cope with the track layout and then changes the pressures to protect the tyres from aggressive toe and camber settings. Depending on what you're running you can go with less inflated tyres, no problem.

There have been setups where I could only normalize tyre wear and lower temperature by increasing the pressure. That has to do with the lateral forces and the vertical load the outside tyres go through when cornering.

Hanoi with its mid and high speed corners will chew your rubber off depending on your suspension geometry and tyre pressures. That's the thing, though: "and". They're set in accordance to each other so your mileage will naturally and literally vary depending on how you run both of those things + driving style.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, marioho said:

Not only on F1 2020, but on real F1 too. All teams generally want to go with as low pressures as possible. Every weekend Pirelli publishes a document like this, with the minimum tye pressures and maximum camber:

811605590_UK2020B.thumb.jpg.a2b6560c268128ec5c634d9594521ad4.jpg

That's for safety and tyre longevity reasons, not performance. If let by the teams will, they would be running much less pressurized tyres.

You need to bear in mind that tyre pressures also have to do with suspension geometry. You change the suspension geometry to cope with the track layout and then changes the pressures to protect the tyres from aggressive toe and camber settings. Depending on what you're running you can go with less inflated tyres, no problem.

There have been setups where I could only normalize tyre wear and lower temperature by increasing the pressure. That has to do with the lateral forces and the vertical load the outside tyres go through when cornering.

Hanoi with its mid and high speed corners will chew your rubber off depending on your suspension geometry and tyre pressures. That's the thing, though: "and". They're set in accordance to each other so your mileage will naturally and literally vary depending on how you run both of those things + driving style.

Very interesting. Thanks!

So if I understand you correctly, aggressive camber (max. right) and toe (max. left) settings must be compensated with low tyre pressure otherwise there's a risk of overheating the tyres. Conservative camber and toe settings allow you to run with higher tyre pressure. Correct?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I drove through Baku yesterday in my quarry and did not understand a little: my Hard wore out faster than the Medium ...
Are the tires softer in 2020?
I remember in 2017 I used SuperSoft and Soft in the race and there was no wear at all ... You could drive the race (50%) on one SuperSoft ...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Dunky1980 said:

Maximum Camber is to the left. Maximum toe is to the right.

My meaning is the outermost setting option on the right respectively left. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@SixtoRodriguez almost! Haha it's the other way around. A track with lots of lateral forces will need a more aggressive suspension geometry to get the most out of the car and more inflated tyres to protect your rubber. Check the videos in the link below, they'll give you a visualization of the whole thing discussed here.

https://forums.codemasters.com/topic/59506-about-tyre-pressures/?do=findComment&comment=561528

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@MilligramSmile the topmost one is the most important, the carcass temperature.

Surface temperature (the middle one) will fluctuate a lot, it is normal. It it gets too high you probably should change your suspension geometry settings depending on the context. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is better to reduce the pressure in the tires in the rain, I think correctly ?
What other parameters should be changed between dry and wet track ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Raise ride height. Consider lowering tyre pressure (specially rear tyres) to increase grip, but beware hard-to-heat tyres. Consider softening the suspension to account for the lower maximum loads and to increase grip. Consider unlocking differentials accordingly to when the oversteering happens, if corner entry (off-throttle) or corner exit (on-throttle). Consider locking the off-throttle diff if losing too much stability on turn in. Consider shifting the brake bias and reducing brake pressure. Consider decreasing negative camber as the car will have a hard time attacking the corners anyway.

But obviously the biggest change you should be looking at is driving style.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×