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F1 2021 | Online Services Down For Maintenance | 26/07/2021 ×

TRACK QUESTIONS FOR F1 2021 GAME?


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54 minutes ago, USPBauer24 said:

Codemasters don't seem to care about any track improvements or layout changes or realism. All tracks currently look far too bright and colourful.

Kerbs have been wrong for years so have the width of some corners. 

They just cookie cutter and copy and paste every single year and then sell us a new game with Devon Butler in it. 

I wish Kunos had the rights to F1. 

You wouldn't want to alienate these little fellas would you  https://youtu.be/tv6vBj1XpZs  .......the Lilliputian problem , that old chestnut.

Yep good idea  , cut them loose and they can get back to bouncing up and down on a trampoline or hitting things with a stick or whatever it is that they do nowadays.

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One tiny change I noticed in a gameplay video that pleased me is that there is now a number on the speed limit sign going into the pits at Silverstone 🙂.

Mainly above though I was meaning that the overall colour palette used is a bit more natural looking than the current game.

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On 6/11/2021 at 11:12 PM, LEWISt17KIMI said:

Why don't you explain to us exactly, how you would spend a whole 2 weeks making modelling, and texturing changes to turn 10. 

Sure. First of all, when I say 2 weeks I mean ten 8-hour days. I would probably need a little bit less than that, but I would use the remaining time to polish my changes.

Here is Turn 10 for reference.

Old:
t10old.thumb.jpg.ef8ebe5f093c354c1f44b09445dc3919.jpg

New:
t10.thumb.jpg.767655cc94de9ad08f993c4702ed326b.jpg


The new Turn 10 is a brand new corner, not just from the top, but in X, Y and Z dimensions as well, meaning there is a new & different elevation change throughout the turn, compared to the existing turn and the old, wider Turn 10 that was used as a run-off zone previously. This means I would have to basically completely rebuild the turn from scratch. Get rid of the old run-off zone, the kerbing, line decals, green concrete patches, gravel pit and then re-draw the corner from the top down with what is called the Spline Tool in 3Ds Max. You basically draw the shape of the corner as a line and then convert it into a 2D-plane (the asphalt). Then you need to match the exact shape of the turn in all 3 dimensions. Since no laser-scanning is available, this is done by hand (or by eye rather). This process can be quite time consuming. Also, keep in mind when I say "build the new turn" I mean you build the turn in isolation first, THEN attach it to the old geometry.

Okay so let's say you finally have finished building your new turn. But now you need to connect it to the geometry where the old turn and old run-off used to be. This is where the fun begins. You now have the job of painfully stitching the new turn to the geo of the straight and to the remains of the old T10. You'll notice on the photo the kerbing on the old turn has been removed. When you delete the kerbs on the old turn, the information won't automatically fill in for you. You need to fill the hole with whatever it is they replaced the kerb with. Asphalt, grass, whatever it is, and then do proper surface transitions between the different materials. Oh and don't forget, since the elevation changed on the new turn 10, that means you will also have to update the elevation on the gravel pits and terrain surrounding the turn as well. This is again done by hand. and you need to manually stitch the gravel to the new geometry changes so that the new piece of track doesn't float above where the old gravel pit used to be. Everything needs to be seamless.

Before I go any further, any significant change in geometry also means you need to re-UV your textures to the new geo. UV Mapping, also known as "unwrapping" means unfolding every single face or triangle into a flat 2D texture space and then packing that space and aligning it with your 2D textures. For stuff like gravel it's easier, because you'd be using a tileable texture. So you can basically select all the whole gravel pit, click a button, attach all the faces together quickly and then scale it to the right size. For stuff like kerbing, you'd have a texture that tiles horizontally only, so all your curved geo (such as the curved kerbing) would have to be unwrapped into a straight strip. Doing so can result in texture stretching which again would need to be manually fixed. Time-consuming. Honestly, UV mapping is the most annoying and time-consuming part of any of this probably. Check out some Youtube videos about UV Mapping in 3DS Max. Yeah. It's about as fun as it looks. I recommend a couple beers before you hit play.

I think the changes to Turn 10 also resulted in a larger run-off area behind the turn, so the position of the tire barriers etc probably has changed as well. You'll want to update those too. Similar steps to above.

Likewise, the tire marks that are visible through the turn... not sure how they did them, but I suspect floating decals. So you'll have to place those as well and make them follow the new curvature of the turn and UV map the planes individually. Speaking of UV Mapping. When you do this, you will need to scale each texture to assure the texel ratio is consistent across the track. Not very hard, but it's an added annoyance that, again, eats up some time in the process. 

Okay so let's say you have successfully built the new turn, unwrapped all your new geometry, successfully attached it to the old track, removed kerbing on the old turn, placed new kerbing and unwrapped that as well, placed your tire mark decals, placed the new sponsoring on the new run-off zones, made sure your texel ratio is valid, adjusted track barriers, placed new paintlines following the updated geo... Now it's time for polish. You're obviously want material transitions where gravel pit meets asphalt, where grass meets gravel, where grass meets asphalt etc. Those are a separate textures with a transparent element in it that masks out the gravel at the edges. Masks for this likely can be re-used from other tracks but they would have to be unwrapped regardless. These would tile horizontally, so would have to be mapped into a straight strip once again. Ugh. Okay, let's assume you've done this for every part of the new turn, you can move on.

You'll notice the grass in the game usually has some 3D elements to it as well to give it depth. These are separate assets that need to be hand-placed on top of the bare bones geometry. The geo for the grass is mostly just flat with a 2D texture that looks like grass. You place those '3D grass' objects onto the flat geo and if you do a good enough job at it you'll now have the illusion that the grass is volumetric and not just a painted surface.

Ok so let's say you've done all that. Congrats, you're done. With the visual part. It's now time to update your collisions. A collision mesh is a lower density version of your visual mesh, it is lower density to save computing power and memory and usually would need to be done by hand if you want it to be fully optimized. Ok, so you can repeat all the steps I did above, except for the texturing and UV parts, and then manually delete edges throughout the geo to lower triangle density. If your collision is too high in detail you'll get yelled at and have your changes rejected. This will take some more time to finish.

Once you've done all that, you've probably forgot to set logic materials for all the different surfaces (this is me basically all the time). So, just gotta go back in there and select all the different surfaces and set Asphalt to register as "Asphalt", "gravel" to "gravel", grass to "grass", etc. This will tell the game what physics and sound effects to apply when you interact with a specific surface.

Now you're done and you submit your changes. You go on about your day and are happy you finally finished the new Turn 10. You start booking tickets for your next vacation. Just before 5PM on Friday afternoon you receive an email from a QA Tester that contains a list of previously unnoticed issues when you built the changes. Turns out, the cars now fall through the road when hitting the exit kerb. Oops, Guess you forgot to patch up all the holes in the collision mesh. Oh and there's another 5 issues you didn't foresee when you completed your task. You cancel your vacation and get back to work. The cries of F1 gaming fans echoing in your dreams as you fall asleep at night. 😄

This is the (slightly over-dramatized) reality of a 3D Artist for video games. Hope it gave you some perspective. Thank you for attending my TED talk.



 

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8 minutes ago, CptBalloonhands said:

Sure. First of all, when I say 2 weeks I mean ten 8-hour days. I would probably need a little bit less than that, but I would use the remaining time to polish my changes.

Here is Turn 10 for reference.

Old:
t10old.thumb.jpg.ef8ebe5f093c354c1f44b09445dc3919.jpg

New:
t10.thumb.jpg.767655cc94de9ad08f993c4702ed326b.jpg


The new Turn 10 is a brand new corner, not just from the top, but in X, Y and Z dimensions as well, meaning there is a new & different elevation change throughout the turn, compared to the existing turn and the old, wider Turn 10 that was used as a run-off zone previously. This means I would have to basically completely rebuild the turn from scratch. Get rid of the old run-off zone, the kerbing, line decals, green concrete patches, gravel pit and then re-draw the corner from the top down with what is called the Spline Tool in 3Ds Max. You basically draw the shape of the corner as a line and then convert it into a 2D-plane (the asphalt). Then you need to match the exact shape of the turn in all 3 dimensions. Since no laser-scanning is available, this is done by hand (or by eye rather). This process can be quite time consuming. Also, keep in mind when I say "build the new turn" I mean you build the turn in isolation first, THEN attach it to the old geometry.

Okay so let's say you finally have finished building your new turn. But now you need to connect it to the geometry where the old turn and old run-off used to be. This is where the fun begins. You now have the job of painfully stitching the new turn to the geo of the straight and to the remains of the old T10. You'll notice on the photo the kerbing on the old turn has been removed. When you delete the kerbs on the old turn, the information won't automatically fill in for you. You need to fill the hole with whatever it is they replaced the kerb with. Asphalt, grass, whatever it is, and then do proper surface transitions between the different materials. Oh and don't forget, since the elevation changed on the new turn 10, that means you will also have to update the elevation on the gravel pits and terrain surrounding the turn as well. This is again done by hand. and you need to manually stitch the gravel to the new geometry changes so that the new piece of track doesn't float above where the old gravel pit used to be. Everything needs to be seamless.

Before I go any further, any significant change in geometry also means you need to re-UV your textures to the new geo. UV Mapping, also known as "unwrapping" means unfolding every single face or triangle into a flat 2D texture space and then packing that space and aligning it with your 2D textures. For stuff like gravel it's easier, because you'd be using a tileable texture. So you can basically select all the whole gravel pit, click a button, attach all the faces together quickly and then scale it to the right size. For stuff like kerbing, you'd have a texture that tiles horizontally only, so all your curved geo (such as the curved kerbing) would have to be unwrapped into a straight strip. Doing so can result in texture stretching which again would need to be manually fixed. Time-consuming. Honestly, UV mapping is the most annoying and time-consuming part of any of this probably. Check out some Youtube videos about UV Mapping in 3DS Max. Yeah. It's about as fun as it looks. I recommend a couple beers before you hit play.

I think the changes to Turn 10 also resulted in a larger run-off area behind the turn, so the position of the tire barriers etc probably has changed as well. You'll want to update those too. Similar steps to above.

Likewise, the tire marks that are visible through the turn... not sure how they did them, but I suspect floating decals. So you'll have to place those as well and make them follow the new curvature of the turn and UV map the planes individually. Speaking of UV Mapping. When you do this, you will need to scale each texture to assure the texel ratio is consistent across the track. Not very hard, but it's an added annoyance that, again, eats up some time in the process. 

Okay so let's say you have successfully built the new turn, unwrapped all your new geometry, successfully attached it to the old track, removed kerbing on the old turn, placed new kerbing and unwrapped that as well, placed your tire mark decals, placed the new sponsoring on the new run-off zones, made sure your texel ratio is valid, adjusted track barriers, placed new paintlines following the updated geo... Now it's time for polish. You're obviously want material transitions where gravel pit meets asphalt, where grass meets gravel, where grass meets asphalt etc. Those are a separate textures with a transparent element in it that masks out the gravel at the edges. Masks for this likely can be re-used from other tracks but they would have to be unwrapped regardless. These would tile horizontally, so would have to be mapped into a straight strip once again. Ugh. Okay, let's assume you've done this for every part of the new turn, you can move on.

You'll notice the grass in the game usually has some 3D elements to it as well to give it depth. These are separate assets that need to be hand-placed on top of the bare bones geometry. The geo for the grass is mostly just flat with a 2D texture that looks like grass. You place those '3D grass' objects onto the flat geo and if you do a good enough job at it you'll now have the illusion that the grass is volumetric and not just a painted surface.

Ok so let's say you've done all that. Congrats, you're done. With the visual part. It's now time to update your collisions. A collision mesh is a lower density version of your visual mesh, it is lower density to save computing power and memory and usually would need to be done by hand if you want it to be fully optimized. Ok, so you can repeat all the steps I did above, except for the texturing and UV parts, and then manually delete edges throughout the geo to lower triangle density. If your collision is too high in detail you'll get yelled at and have your changes rejected. This will take some more time to finish.

Once you've done all that, you've probably forgot to set logic materials for all the different surfaces (this is me basically all the time). So, just gotta go back in there and select all the different surfaces and set Asphalt to register as "Asphalt", "gravel" to "gravel", grass to "grass", etc. This will tell the game what physics and sound effects to apply when you interact with a specific surface.

Now you're done and you submit your changes. You go on about your day and are happy you finally finished the new Turn 10. You start booking tickets for your next vacation. Just before 5PM on Friday afternoon you receive an email from a QA Tester that contains a list of previously unnoticed issues when you built the changes. Turns out, the cars now fall through the road when hitting the exit kerb. Oops, Guess you forgot to patch up all the holes in the collision mesh. Oh and there's another 5 issues you didn't foresee when you completed your task. You cancel your vacation and get back to work. The cries of F1 gaming fans echoing in your dreams as you fall asleep at night. 😄

This is the (slightly over-dramatized) reality of a 3D Artist for video games. Hope it gave you some perspective. Thank you for attending my TED talk.



 

What about the elevation change, like for turn 11 of Spain who's for me it should be flat, and the Bus stop chicane from Spa what in the game it's flat and should have at least a bit more of elevation, it's that hard to change just that? Like, they just need to swap basicly the both elevation, you can't go flat around turn 11 of Spain because of the elevation who unbalance the car, but you can run flat at bus stop chicane.

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5 minutes ago, ParadoxAMG53 said:

What about the elevation change, like for turn 11 of Spain who's for me it should be flat, and the Bus stop chicane from Spa what in the game it's flat and should have at least a bit more of elevation, it's that hard to change just that? Like, they just need to swap basicly the both elevation, you can't go flat around turn 11 of Spain because of the elevation who unbalance the car, but you can run flat at bus stop chicane.

The bus stop chicane in Spa. Yeah the track surface is too flat compared to its real-life counterpart. It wouldn't take very long to fix it, maybe a few days or so, maybe as little as a day even. I'm just estimating this based on the tools I know and work with, but they may have internal tools to speed up some of these processes. Based on what I saw in the Zandvoort making-of they do use 3Ds Max and use Substance Painter for texturing stuff like kerbs. I'm highly familiar with both so I think my estimates are somewhat accurate but there may be other stuff I'm missing.
 

Not sure what you mean by Turn 11 in Spain being flat. It's certainly at an angle, and not flat. Flat means _______________ . A straight line. Anything other than that means a lot more work is involved in adjusting things that connect to the track surface, like kerbs, gravel etc.

Edited by CptBalloonhands
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19 minutes ago, CptBalloonhands said:

Sure. First of all, when I say 2 weeks I mean ten 8-hour days. I would probably need a little bit less than that, but I would use the remaining time to polish my changes.

Here is Turn 10 for reference.

Old:
t10old.thumb.jpg.ef8ebe5f093c354c1f44b09445dc3919.jpg

New:
t10.thumb.jpg.767655cc94de9ad08f993c4702ed326b.jpg


The new Turn 10 is a brand new corner, not just from the top, but in X, Y and Z dimensions as well, meaning there is a new & different elevation change throughout the turn, compared to the existing turn and the old, wider Turn 10 that was used as a run-off zone previously. This means I would have to basically completely rebuild the turn from scratch. Get rid of the old run-off zone, the kerbing, line decals, green concrete patches, gravel pit and then re-draw the corner from the top down with what is called the Spline Tool in 3Ds Max. You basically draw the shape of the corner as a line and then convert it into a 2D-plane (the asphalt). Then you need to match the exact shape of the turn in all 3 dimensions. Since no laser-scanning is available, this is done by hand (or by eye rather). This process can be quite time consuming. Also, keep in mind when I say "build the new turn" I mean you build the turn in isolation first, THEN attach it to the old geometry.

Okay so let's say you finally have finished building your new turn. But now you need to connect it to the geometry where the old turn and old run-off used to be. This is where the fun begins. You now have the job of painfully stitching the new turn to the geo of the straight and to the remains of the old T10. You'll notice on the photo the kerbing on the old turn has been removed. When you delete the kerbs on the old turn, the information won't automatically fill in for you. You need to fill the hole with whatever it is they replaced the kerb with. Asphalt, grass, whatever it is, and then do proper surface transitions between the different materials. Oh and don't forget, since the elevation changed on the new turn 10, that means you will also have to update the elevation on the gravel pits and terrain surrounding the turn as well. This is again done by hand. and you need to manually stitch the gravel to the new geometry changes so that the new piece of track doesn't float above where the old gravel pit used to be. Everything needs to be seamless.

Before I go any further, any significant change in geometry also means you need to re-UV your textures to the new geo. UV Mapping, also known as "unwrapping" means unfolding every single face or triangle into a flat 2D texture space and then packing that space and aligning it with your 2D textures. For stuff like gravel it's easier, because you'd be using a tileable texture. So you can basically select all the whole gravel pit, click a button, attach all the faces together quickly and then scale it to the right size. For stuff like kerbing, you'd have a texture that tiles horizontally only, so all your curved geo (such as the curved kerbing) would have to be unwrapped into a straight strip. Doing so can result in texture stretching which again would need to be manually fixed. Time-consuming. Honestly, UV mapping is the most annoying and time-consuming part of any of this probably. Check out some Youtube videos about UV Mapping in 3DS Max. Yeah. It's about as fun as it looks. I recommend a couple beers before you hit play.

I think the changes to Turn 10 also resulted in a larger run-off area behind the turn, so the position of the tire barriers etc probably has changed as well. You'll want to update those too. Similar steps to above.

Likewise, the tire marks that are visible through the turn... not sure how they did them, but I suspect floating decals. So you'll have to place those as well and make them follow the new curvature of the turn and UV map the planes individually. Speaking of UV Mapping. When you do this, you will need to scale each texture to assure the texel ratio is consistent across the track. Not very hard, but it's an added annoyance that, again, eats up some time in the process. 

Okay so let's say you have successfully built the new turn, unwrapped all your new geometry, successfully attached it to the old track, removed kerbing on the old turn, placed new kerbing and unwrapped that as well, placed your tire mark decals, placed the new sponsoring on the new run-off zones, made sure your texel ratio is valid, adjusted track barriers, placed new paintlines following the updated geo... Now it's time for polish. You're obviously want material transitions where gravel pit meets asphalt, where grass meets gravel, where grass meets asphalt etc. Those are a separate textures with a transparent element in it that masks out the gravel at the edges. Masks for this likely can be re-used from other tracks but they would have to be unwrapped regardless. These would tile horizontally, so would have to be mapped into a straight strip once again. Ugh. Okay, let's assume you've done this for every part of the new turn, you can move on.

You'll notice the grass in the game usually has some 3D elements to it as well to give it depth. These are separate assets that need to be hand-placed on top of the bare bones geometry. The geo for the grass is mostly just flat with a 2D texture that looks like grass. You place those '3D grass' objects onto the flat geo and if you do a good enough job at it you'll now have the illusion that the grass is volumetric and not just a painted surface.

Ok so let's say you've done all that. Congrats, you're done. With the visual part. It's now time to update your collisions. A collision mesh is a lower density version of your visual mesh, it is lower density to save computing power and memory and usually would need to be done by hand if you want it to be fully optimized. Ok, so you can repeat all the steps I did above, except for the texturing and UV parts, and then manually delete edges throughout the geo to lower triangle density. If your collision is too high in detail you'll get yelled at and have your changes rejected. This will take some more time to finish.

Once you've done all that, you've probably forgot to set logic materials for all the different surfaces (this is me basically all the time). So, just gotta go back in there and select all the different surfaces and set Asphalt to register as "Asphalt", "gravel" to "gravel", grass to "grass", etc. This will tell the game what physics and sound effects to apply when you interact with a specific surface.

Now you're done and you submit your changes. You go on about your day and are happy you finally finished the new Turn 10. You start booking tickets for your next vacation. Just before 5PM on Friday afternoon you receive an email from a QA Tester that contains a list of previously unnoticed issues when you built the changes. Turns out, the cars now fall through the road when hitting the exit kerb. Oops, Guess you forgot to patch up all the holes in the collision mesh. Oh and there's another 5 issues you didn't foresee when you completed your task. You cancel your vacation and get back to work. The cries of F1 gaming fans echoing in your dreams as you fall asleep at night. 😄

This is the (slightly over-dramatized) reality of a 3D Artist for video games. Hope it gave you some perspective. Thank you for attending my TED talk.



 

It's something only those who work directly or something related to this area could understand. 

Hundreds of hours worth of work, only to be seen & feel by the consumers for a split moment of experience, and your grand reward is people constantly calling you a lazy piece of pepperoni....the pain is real.

Edited by DRTApophis
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2 minutes ago, DRTApophis said:

It's something only those who work directly or something related to this area could understand. 

Hundreds of hours worth of work, only to be seen & feel by the consumers for a split moment of experience, and your reward is people calling you a lazy piece of pepperoni....the pain is real.

Hehe yeah, although to be fair most of us grew up calling devs the same thing when we played our favourite games. On the upside, when a game is really well done you have a whole new level of appreciation for the work that went into it. My fiancee has gotten used to me pausing every 5 seconds to stare at nicely detailed brick walls and stuff like that.

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1 minute ago, CptBalloonhands said:

The bus stop chicane in Spa. Yeah the track surface is too flat compared to its real-life counterpart. It wouldn't take very long to fix it, maybe a few days or so. I'm just estimating this based on the tools I know and work with, but they may have internal tools to speed up some of these processes.
 

Not sure what you mean by Turn 11 in Spain being flat. It's certainly at an angle, and not flat. Flat means _______________ . A straight line. Anything other than that means a lot more work is involved in adjusting things that connect to the track surface, like kerbs, gravel etc.

I mean in the game you have to lift the throtlle a bit to not spun in the game, when in the real life they can basicly go flat on throtlle on turn 11. At least the turn 11 shouldnt upset the car as much as the game does. But thanks for the answers.

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Just now, ParadoxAMG53 said:

I mean in the game you have to lift the throtlle a bit to not spun in the game, when in the real life they can basicly go flat on throtlle on turn 11. At least the turn 11 shouldnt upset the car as much as the game does. But thanks for the answers.

Oh I see what you mean. Yeah I agree. That kerb is super annoying. It's possible that whoever built the collision for that kerb built it slightly too tall or the angle is not smooth enough, or it maybe something more deeply engrained in the way the game processes kerb physics globally throughout the game. I'm really not sure.

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36 minutes ago, CptBalloonhands said:

Oh I see what you mean. Yeah I agree. That kerb is super annoying. It's possible that whoever built the collision for that kerb built it slightly too tall or the angle is not smooth enough, or it maybe something more deeply engrained in the way the game processes kerb physics globally throughout the game. I'm really not sure.

And what we have seen an early footage, maybe it's even worse, the elevation + the new curb system, i dont know where they found those things, like the bump on Suzuka, this is clearly wrong and they didnt fix it. For what you wroted in this topic, it's no that easy to fix it, and a lot of work it's necessary just for a single turn, but the elevation change maybe they can do it, hope it's better when the full release come. 

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54 minutes ago, CptBalloonhands said:

The bus stop chicane in Spa. Yeah the track surface is too flat compared to its real-life counterpart. It wouldn't take very long to fix it, maybe a few days or so, maybe as little as a day even. I'm just estimating this based on the tools I know and work with, but they may have internal tools to speed up some of these processes. Based on what I saw in the Zandvoort making-of they do use 3Ds Max and use Substance Painter for texturing stuff like kerbs. I'm highly familiar with both so I think my estimates are somewhat accurate but there may be other stuff I'm missing.
 

Not sure what you mean by Turn 11 in Spain being flat. It's certainly at an angle, and not flat. Flat means _______________ . A straight line. Anything other than that means a lot more work is involved in adjusting things that connect to the track surface, like kerbs, gravel etc.

Speaking of elevations, I wonder what's going on with Eau Rouge (the bottom part of it).

If you drive your MyTeam car through that section, doesn't matter what suspension setting you have, or if you run the highest ride height, or if you not touch the curb at all. You will ALWAYS lose big chunks of front wing (visual damage). 

There're also lots of curbs on other race tracks, where they seemingly look flat (which should be), but when you drive on certain part of them (usually the outer edge of the curb), you'll notice both your floor and front wing will get lots of visual damages like bits of them fell off which are very noticeable.

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14 minutes ago, DRTApophis said:

Speaking of elevations, I wonder what's going on with Eau Rouge (the bottom part of it).

If you drive your MyTeam car through that section, doesn't matter what suspension setting you have, or if you run the highest ride height, or if you not touch the curb at all. You will ALWAYS lose big chunks of front wing (visual damage). 

There're also lots of curbs on other race tracks, where they seemingly look flat (which should be), but when you drive on certain part of them (usually the outer edge of the curb), you'll notice both your floor and front wing will get lots of visual damages like bits of them fell off which are very noticeable.

One important thing to know is that how things look in a game vs how things behave and interact with the character model (or in this case, the car) aren't necessarily connected at all. Visual geometry (what you see on screen) is completely separate from collision geometry (invisible to the eye) in games. As an example, think of a flight of broken old stairs in Assassin's Creed. The visual mesh will have cracks and some of the steps may not be completely straight, but the collision mesh will be just perfectly box shaped steps, stacked on top of one another, for the character model to interact with physically.

The same thing probably applies to the F1 games as well, although the collisions at least on the kerbs seems to be fairly detailed, at least in the up-close slow-motion replays where you can see the wheels bumping over the individual ridges in the kerbs.

It may have to do with the steep angle of the turn and the collision of the front wing of the car as well. We can only speculate. 😕

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42 minutes ago, ParadoxAMG53 said:

And what we have seen an early footage, maybe it's even worse, the elevation + the new curb system, i dont know where they found those things, like the bump on Suzuka, this is clearly wrong and they didnt fix it. For what you wroted in this topic, it's no that easy to fix it, and a lot of work it's necessary just for a single turn, but the elevation change maybe they can do it, hope it's better when the full release come. 

The bump in Suzuka did get fixed, so clearly they are able to correct those issues if enough people notice them and complain about it.

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1 hour ago, CptBalloonhands said:

The bump in Suzuka did get fixed, so clearly they are able to correct those issues if enough people notice them and complain about it.

was the bump fixed because people were complaining?

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13 minutes ago, FTBuzzard said:

was the bump fixed because people were complaining?

I don't know that, but logically I would imagine that when you have basically everyone in E-Sports pointing out that there is an issue with a track, it would lead to it being flagged internally and priority would be increased. Games typically release with hundreds, thousands of bugs when they ship. Most of them low priority, many marked as "will not fix", and you're likely to never even encounter the great majority of them. The infamous Suzuka bump I think received a great deal of coverage and everybody knew about it. I don't know if it got fixed because of that or because an artist took it upon themselves or if some QC tester flagged it on their own but from my own experience of working in the industry we do tend to address issues more quickly if a fair portion of the player base points out a specific issue.

Maybe we should get a "Fix the Barcelona bump" thread trending and hope for the best 😉

Edited by CptBalloonhands
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On 6/9/2021 at 12:21 PM, AndRe5550148 said:

One corner needs to be corrected in Spain, In Australia, you really need to correct two corners, are they really that lazy?

 

Australia is changing like 9 corners and taking 5 seconds off the lap time. Its extensive changes. 

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15 hours ago, DRTApophis said:

It's something only those who work directly or something related to this area could understand. 

Hundreds of hours worth of work, only to be seen & feel by the consumers for a split moment of experience, and your grand reward is people constantly calling you a lazy piece of pepperoni....the pain is real.

And that (excellent) post doesn't even fully cover it either. You've also got to define the ideal racing line and train the AI on it, set track limits for penalties, modify gates for the Practice Programme, update UI elements, change replay camera angles, get a new "track guide" intro video from F1 (the one with Crofty describing the layout) etc.

On top of all this, you need to get the final assets approved by the track (and probably F1 too) 🙂 

 

Now imagine this for the 60+ corners that make up Imola, Portimao and Jeddah and you can see why making 3 tracks in a year (on top of making the rest of the game) is a big task 🙂 

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4 minutes ago, PJTierney said:

And that (excellent) post doesn't even fully cover it either. Once you've got the model updated, you then need to attach audio to each surface so that gravel sounds like gravel, tarmac like tarmac, kerbs like kerbs etc., same for the handling model. You've also got to define the ideal racing line and train the AI on it, set track limits for penalties etc.

On top of all this, you need to get the final assets approved by the track (and probably F1 too) 🙂 

 

Now imagine this for the 60+ corners that make up Imola, Portimao and Jeddah and you can see why making 3 tracks in a year (on top of making the rest of the game) is a big task 🙂 

3 new tracks is so exciting I can't even tell you, when one of them is Imola as well :classic_love:

And to keep hold of the excellent Zandvoort AND to get rid of the terrible Vietnam, perfection. 

I guess Jeddah might be love it or hate it but the scenery should be immense at the very least. 

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I've done Imola and Portimao a few times in Project CARS 3, they'll be good fun in F1 🙂 

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Missed a few posts and I don't know if this has been asked already but I wonder how much time would be shaved off if Codies had the laser scan data to start off with? I understand that it would just be a template, still has to be built upon and the AI coded. Or would it just take the same amount of time and just be that little bit more accurate?

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5 hours ago, KNT2011 said:

3 new tracks is so exciting I can't even tell you, when one of them is Imola as well :classic_love:

And to keep hold of the excellent Zandvoort AND to get rid of the terrible Vietnam, perfection. 

I guess Jeddah might be love it or hate it but the scenery should be immense at the very least. 

I really can't wait for Imola, it's one hell of a ride and I really love how the whole track looks. Though I'll surely miss Vietnam, other than the fact that the backdrop and environments around the track were a bit mundane and the Ai seems to crash a lot there, it's not too bad of a track, that long straight really is quite spectacular. 

Edited by DRTApophis
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5 hours ago, s00zster said:

Missed a few posts and I don't know if this has been asked already but I wonder how much time would be shaved off if Codies had the laser scan data to start off with? I understand that it would just be a template, still has to be built upon and the AI coded. Or would it just take the same amount of time and just be that little bit more accurate?

It definitely would speed things up quite a bit. At the very least it would provide the artists building the tracks with the exact location of where all the elements need to be, the exact flow of the track surface, the precise radius of each corner, subtle elevation changes and differences that would be difficult to catch by just "eyeballing" it. One of the most difficult aspects of 3D Modelling is building things 'to scale'. As in, the size of a chair in relation to the size of a car next to a building. They all need to be scaled realistically. When you build a large environment like a racetrack, one based on a real-life location that applies even more. So having scan data would make it a lot easier. The scan data sort of acts like a sheet of transparent copy paper. All the actual in-game track geometry would still need to be built despite having the scan data, but everything would be so much more accurate and you could just trace the low-density game geo over the high definition geo. Kind of like draw-by-numbers instead of starting with a blank page. So, hopefully, this is something that the new EA-Codemasters relationship can facilitate for the brand moving forward.

Edited by CptBalloonhands
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  • 2 weeks later...

from Autosport.com

Quote

Abu Dhabi’s Formula 1 track is to undergo layout modifications this summer in a bid to help boost overtaking for this year’s season finale.

Yes, now there will be changes to the circuit at Yas Marina that would need to go into the game too. Whilst they haven't revealed what the changes will be publicly yet, the strong rumour is that the chicane right before the hairpin in sector 1 will be removed, and corners 11, 12, 13 and 14 (at the end of the second backstraight) will be converted into one long sweeping left hander

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25 minutes ago, RickPhotosphere said:

from Autosport.com

Yes, now there will be changes to the circuit at Yas Marina that would need to go into the game too. Whilst they haven't revealed what the changes will be publicly yet, the strong rumour is that the chicane right before the hairpin in sector 1 will be removed, and corners 11, 12, 13 and 14 (at the end of the second backstraight) will be converted into one long sweeping left hander

Can we add the rallycross layout?

 

DiRT Rally 2.0: Yas Marina Circuit, Abu Dhabi (Rallycross Track) | Buy Now  | DPSimulation

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