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Toe and Heel

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I wanted to ask if you have the same feeling that I have using this technique. I played a lot in Assetto Corsa and the heel and toe I could naturally. in Dirt Rally instead, giving the revs up I have a feeling that the engine revs do not rise enough and often block the tires anyway. Something wrong, there is some setting that can help me or is it a problem of the game? Thank you in advance

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This is a complex question.

In one hand, you´re used to drive circuit cars which mostly rev up too quick due to lack of turbo and light flywheel. Rally cars, specially the turbo old ones, tends to rev up (and down) "slowly". I dont know why is this, but many cars does.

In the other hand, drivetrain physics on DR are "under investigation". If I remember well, it´s to come a new physics update... maybe theres the solution for many things asked before.. including the toe/heel technique, and the engine brake issue (car brakes just too much when you release the throttle).

AFAIK, actually you can not do nothing to improve this through settings.

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In my opinion there needs to be something done with the grip level, how well the brakes work on certain cars and engine brake. The way things are now, I am having to jump over gears when braking down from high speeds when driving a car with a h-shift and clutch. Instead of for example going from 6-5-4-3-2-1 down to a hairpin, I am having to do 6-4-2-1 to match the speed the brakes and enging brake stops the car.

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Benniz said:
In my opinion there needs to be something done with the grip level, how well the brakes work on certain cars and engine brake. The way things are now, I am having to jump over gears when braking down from high speeds when driving a car with a h-shift and clutch. Instead of for example going from 6-5-4-3-2-1 down to a hairpin, I am having to do 6-4-2-1 to match the speed the brakes and enging brake stops the car.
Thats nothing unusual, especially with group B or PP cars. The often skip gears when breaking for a corner. The technique is called double clutching and can be used in combination with heel n toe to skip gears during downshifting without upsetting the car.

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Downshifting and skipping a gear is not called double clutching.

Clutching into neutral, letting out the clutch, then raising the rpm(using heel-toe or just blipping the throttle), then clutching into a lower gear(could be one gear lower, but also could be two or more lower) is what double clutching is. 

No biggie, just saying.

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BigFattee said:
Downshifting and skipping a gear is not called double clutching.

Clutching into neutral, letting out the clutch, then raising the rpm(using heel-toe or just blipping the throttle), then clutching into a lower gear(could be one gear lower, but also could be two or more lower) is what double clutching is. 

No biggie, just saying.
I remember a similar procedure going UP through the gears in my fathers 1942 Dodge WC. As I recall it, one must get the revs up in first gear, clutch... put it in neutral, give more revs, clutch, change gear, and release. I could of course be remembering it wrong, it's been many years since I've been in it. We called it double clutching, but perhaps that's just a funny swedish way of saying it? This is the kind of Dodge I speak of:


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As far as I know that /\ is double clutching, it's for gearboxes with no synchros, and heel and toe is just rev matching to make smoother/quicker downshifts that don't upset the car.
It will be interesting to see what the V2 physics do to improve the feeling of momentum in some of the cars, I feel like the RX cars feel more natural in that sense.

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BigFattee said:
Downshifting and skipping a gear is not called double clutching.

Clutching into neutral, letting out the clutch, then raising the rpm(using heel-toe or just blipping the throttle), then clutching into a lower gear(could be one gear lower, but also could be two or more lower) is what double clutching is. 

No biggie, just saying.
I remember a similar procedure going UP through the gears in my fathers 1942 Dodge WC. As I recall it, one must get the revs up in first gear, clutch... put it in neutral, give more revs, clutch, change gear, and release. I could of course be remembering it wrong, it's been many years since I've been in it. We called it double clutching, but perhaps that's just a funny swedish way of saying it? This is the kind of Dodge I speak of:


Yeah same thing going up thru the gears, except you don't raise the rpm between shifts. You wait for the rpms to fall to match the speed of the higher gear, between shifts. That is used in non-syncromesh transmissions, but can be used with syncromesh transmissions when downshifting to help reduce stress on the clutch, and to prevent sudden loss in traction. There is no real advantage double clutching when upshifting with a syncromesh transmission.

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And in vehicles with smaller engines and non-syncromesh transmissions, when upshifting, you may have to hold the rpm using the throttle because as soon as you clutch into neutral, the rpm might drop too quickly and not match the higher gear rpm, before you can clutch again. 

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Can someone tell me why the Toe-Heel technique is used? Is it to increase the engine braking?

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It used so you don't get a sudden near lock up of the wheels while braking down, if the engine is running slower than the car. Basically not to unsettle the car. The technique is more relevant on tarmac than gravel.

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Benniz said:
It used so you don't get a sudden near lock up of the wheels while braking down, if the engine is running slower than the car. Basically not to unsettle the car. The technique is more relevant on tarmac than gravel.
This and it smoothness out your downs shifts so there is no time lost matching the engine RPM to the selected gear. Look up some youtube clips and you could even try it in your own car if it's a manual, you'll get a better idea of what it's for.

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Malyngo said:
If you try it in your real car, better make sure to have enough room around you.
This is also/especially true if you want to try out left foot braking in your real car. 
Great point! I would like to add that it is not a bad thing to learn (safely) 'just in case'. I had to learn left-foot braking on the fly when my 1979 Scirocco got some water in the fuel distributor and was bogging really badly. I had to keep the revs up constantly just to get home so I had to pop out of gear and left-foot brake to a stop - in city traffic. Not fun. 

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LanderD said:
Can someone tell me why the Toe-Heel technique is used? Is it to increase the engine braking?
Precisely it is used to EVADE some engine braking, as you are matching high revs with speed downshifting. Lets say, you "prepare" the engine revs to match exacly the next gear down while full braking.  Otherwise, if you just release the clutch, the engine have to rev from i.e. 2000 RPM to 5000 forcefully

I you do the right way, you are punishing the brakes much more; wich is much more admissible than damaging the engine, clutch and gearbox if you dont use TOE/heel tech.

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