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Bear's Happy Place


thecraicbear

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JZStudios said:
Alrighty then Porky....
Was wondering where you were Bear.
In unrelated news, I've decided to finally start building a Porsche 911 GT1 model that we've had for the past 10+ years, of which the entire time I've been wanting to build it.
What scale? I'm building a 1/48 Dornier Do-335 "Pfeil" at the moment, as well as a 1/24 Fokker Dr. 1 by Merit.
Hey I finished the Do-335 a couple of years ago, I think its the Timyia kit.  First kit in a long while that I didn't go crazy $$ on photo etched parts.
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gfRally said:
JZStudios said:
Alrighty then Porky....
Was wondering where you were Bear.
In unrelated news, I've decided to finally start building a Porsche 911 GT1 model that we've had for the past 10+ years, of which the entire time I've been wanting to build it.
What scale? I'm building a 1/48 Dornier Do-335 "Pfeil" at the moment, as well as a 1/24 Fokker Dr. 1 by Merit.
Hey I finished the Do-335 a couple of years ago, I think its the Timyia kit.  First kit in a long while that I didn't go crazy $$ on photo etched parts.
Yeah mine is Tamiya as well - the trainer version, so two cockpits! Awesome fit so far, love Tamiya.
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Hey, I'm a Tamiya fan as well - but on the RC side of things. I just put together an M06 RWD chassis with an ND Miata body recently. Not quite as fiddly to build as a model kit, but in my experience, Tamiya kits always have great fit and finish.
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I have returned from the abyss! 

I forgot my pw, and had issues with the link being sent by email, but the lovely people on the DR Twitter helped sort that. 
Welcome back. Let's celebrate your re-appearance by enjoying this stupid picture:


I can't stop laughing. I'm sat here, crying laughing on my own. 
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JZStudios said:
Alrighty then Porky....
Was wondering where you were Bear.
In unrelated news, I've decided to finally start building a Porsche 911 GT1 model that we've had for the past 10+ years, of which the entire time I've been wanting to build it.
What scale? I'm building a 1/48 Dornier Do-335 "Pfeil" at the moment, as well as a 1/24 Fokker Dr. 1 by Merit.
According to the box between the Japanese it says 1/24. My biggest issue is I just spent $40 on paint so I can use like 3 drops of each color. Of which I went to some overarching hobby shop across the street from my work and they only had the Testors Enamel.... which I'm not a huge fan of.
My other biggest issue is the last time I tried a model was a FA-18 Hornet Blue Angel when I was like 10 and absolutely hated the decals, of which there's lots of minuscule ones on this.
It's also a Tamiya. I've about got the engine bay done. The thing I find interesting is inside the box they have little ads for other models and they have a rally mechanics set with a bunch of guys in blue jumpsuits pretending to do things.

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JZStudios said:
According to the box between the Japanese it says 1/24. My biggest issue is I just spent $40 on paint so I can use like 3 drops of each color. Of which I went to some overarching hobby shop across the street from my work and they only had the Testors Enamel.... which I'm not a huge fan of.
My other biggest issue is the last time I tried a model was a FA-18 Hornet Blue Angel when I was like 10 and absolutely hated the decals, of which there's lots of minuscule ones on this.
It's also a Tamiya. I've about got the engine bay done. The thing I find interesting is inside the box they have little ads for other models and they have a rally mechanics set with a bunch of guys in blue jumpsuits pretending to do things.

I love using enamel paints myself - haven't tried Testors but I'm using Humbrol a lot - because if I mess up a paintjob with enamel paint there's a nice and easy solution.

Put the affected part(s) in a plastic bag or container, soak in Mr. Muscle oven cleaner (use mouth & nose protection as it stinks to high heaven), seal the bag/container and let it sit for up to 24 hours. Then take out the parts and rinse with water; might need to scrub a little with an old toothbrush, but the paint will come right off and you'll have a nice, fresh piece of plastic ready to start all over again. Mr. Muscle is awesome as it does nothing to the plastic itself, not even clear parts - all it does it eat through the paint. I find acrylic paints to be a lot harder to remove, so I mainly stick to enamel... just in case.

Decaling is very simple if you're patient and do it right. If you'd like I can give you some pointers.
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JZStudios said:
According to the box between the Japanese it says 1/24. My biggest issue is I just spent $40 on paint so I can use like 3 drops of each color. Of which I went to some overarching hobby shop across the street from my work and they only had the Testors Enamel.... which I'm not a huge fan of.
My other biggest issue is the last time I tried a model was a FA-18 Hornet Blue Angel when I was like 10 and absolutely hated the decals, of which there's lots of minuscule ones on this.
It's also a Tamiya. I've about got the engine bay done. The thing I find interesting is inside the box they have little ads for other models and they have a rally mechanics set with a bunch of guys in blue jumpsuits pretending to do things.

I love using enamel paints myself - haven't tried Testors but I'm using Humbrol a lot - because if I mess up a paintjob with enamel paint there's a nice and easy solution.

Put the affected part(s) in a plastic bag or container, soak in Mr. Muscle oven cleaner (use mouth & nose protection as it stinks to high heaven), seal the bag/container and let it sit for up to 24 hours. Then take out the parts and rinse with water; might need to scrub a little with an old toothbrush, but the paint will come right off and you'll have a nice, fresh piece of plastic ready to start all over again. Mr. Muscle is awesome as it does nothing to the plastic itself, not even clear parts - all it does it eat through the paint. I find acrylic paints to be a lot harder to remove, so I mainly stick to enamel... just in case.

Decaling is very simple if you're patient and do it right. If you'd like I can give you some pointers.
Hmm. Maybe I'm doing something wrong, but the Testors doesn't give very even coats for me and I need to recoat like 4-5 times, and it takes forever to dry. Never even heard of Mr. Muscle. Maybe that's a European version of Mr. Clean? Who's like a white bald Mr. T.
I'm trying to think of a clever name for "Porks Hobby Hour" But sure. I don't understand why not just use stickers. They can do everything a Decal can but with less effort.
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Enamel paint is a bit more demanding than acrylics. You need to stir the paint really well before using it, make sure all the pigments are mixed well with the thinner - then close the can and shake it well for up to a minute. Only then will the paint perform as it should.

Before you do any decaling, make sure you have glosscoated the model first, the decals becomes a lot easier to position this way. The decals should be cut from the sheet one at a time and dipped in warm water for 5-10 seconds (not until the decal starts coming off!) and then placed on a paper towel to absorb excess fluid. You can gently poke the decal with a toothpick until you feel that it starts moving around on its own, without any resistance.

Now it's ready to place onto the model. Hold the sheet with the decal next to the place you want to position it, and gently move it into place with a finger, or mayhap a toothpick or some other thing you deem appropriate. Gently. Once you're happy with the positioning of the decals, wipe off excess water (gently) with a cottonbud. Once the decals is dry enough, you can gently roll the cottonbud over the decal in several sweeps to remove any airbubbles trapped underneath it.

When all the decals are on, make sure you give the model another glosscoat to seal the decals in and avoid rubbing them off when manhandling the kit to show off to your buddies. This will also give the impression that the decals are painted on. On military vehicles such as jeeps, tanks, aircraft etc a mattcoat is put on afterwards instead - much like the one I made:


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dwkGravey said:
tbtstt said:
Damn. I haven't built a model kit for year, but this talk of kits is making me want to!
It's reminding me that I still haven't worked up the courage to paint my Rallyman cars. Never painted miniatures before, although I did paint model kits as a kid (but I was a kid, so the painting wasn't great).
So... I don't speak whatever language that is, but is that a rally board game? And google would tell me yes, and it seems quite complicated.
Enamel paint is a bit more demanding than acrylics. You need to stir the paint really well before using it, make sure all the pigments are mixed well with the thinner - then close the can and shake it well for up to a minute. Only then will the paint perform as it should.

Before you do any decaling, make sure you have glosscoated the model first, the decals becomes a lot easier to position this way. The decals should be cut from the sheet one at a time and dipped in warm water for 5-10 seconds (not until the decal starts coming off!) and then placed on a paper towel to absorb excess fluid. You can gently poke the decal with a toothpick until you feel that it starts moving around on its own, without any resistance.

Now it's ready to place onto the model. Hold the sheet with the decal next to the place you want to position it, and gently move it into place with a finger, or mayhap a toothpick or some other thing you deem appropriate. Gently. Once you're happy with the positioning of the decals, wipe off excess water (gently) with a cottonbud. Once the decals is dry enough, you can gently roll the cottonbud over the decal in several sweeps to remove any airbubbles trapped underneath it.

When all the decals are on, make sure you give the model another glosscoat to seal the decals in and avoid rubbing them off when manhandling the kit to show off to your buddies. This will also give the impression that the decals are painted on. On military vehicles such as jeeps, tanks, aircraft etc a mattcoat is put on afterwards instead - much like the one I made:


Currently I'm just trying to put a decal on bare plastic. Guess I'll try my luck. Every time I tried them before they always tore.

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I haven't looked for a long time, but does anyone still make Rally cars?  I remember when I was younger I would see these in the hobby shops, but my Dad always talked me into American cars or Porsches :smile:  No big deal at this point in my life, I would have trashed them by now anyhow from moving etc.
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gfRally said:
I haven't looked for a long time, but does anyone still make Rally cars?  I remember when I was younger I would see these in the hobby shops, but my Dad always talked me into American cars or Porsches :smile:  No big deal at this point in my life, I would have trashed them by now anyhow from moving etc.
Tamiya still makes rally cars, and there are a few other makers, such as Belkits, that also makes rally cars.
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JZStudios said:
dwkGravey said:
tbtstt said:
Damn. I haven't built a model kit for year, but this talk of kits is making me want to!
It's reminding me that I still haven't worked up the courage to paint my Rallyman cars. Never painted miniatures before, although I did paint model kits as a kid (but I was a kid, so the painting wasn't great).
So... I don't speak whatever language that is, but is that a rally board game? And google would tell me yes, and it seems quite complicated.
It is a rally board game, and it's dead simple to play, but packs in a whole swath of rally simulation (like tire choice *ahem* Dirt Rally), and you should all play it.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yPGOT2ommXc

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JZStudios said:
Well, I tried it. Thought it worked okay, only tore halfway through it, then found out it didn't stick. Tried to reapply it, that didn't work either. I hate these damn things.
Use more water to avoid tearing the decals - the drier they become before you have them into the desired position, the easier they tear. Try brushing some water in the spot you want the decal to stick - you can always remove excess fluids with a cottonbud afterwards.

There are products designed for the sole purpose of making decaling easier - my weapon(s) of choice are MicroSet and MicroSol. I figured you'd want the basic, ancient ways that wouldn't cost any extra cash though - the way I myself used to do it until 2013.


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JZStudios said:
Well, I tried it. Thought it worked okay, only tore halfway through it, then found out it didn't stick. Tried to reapply it, that didn't work either. I hate these damn things.
Use more water to avoid tearing the decals - the drier they become before you have them into the desired position, the easier they tear. Try brushing some water in the spot you want the decal to stick - you can always remove excess fluids with a cottonbud afterwards.

There are products designed for the sole purpose of making decaling easier - my weapon(s) of choice are MicroSet and MicroSol. I figured you'd want the basic, ancient ways that wouldn't cost any extra cash though - the way I myself used to do it until 2013.


Well if the damn things would just work. I'm about to just try and mix Epoxy and glue the stupid thing on.
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I've found an easier way. I wetted the surface down for the third time, stuck the decal on, an hit it with the hot air gun. Problem solved. Probably could've tried to get some of the air bubbles out, but at this point I'm just glad the damn things on.

Hmm. The picture makes all the mistakes bigger.
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Enamel paint is a bit more demanding than acrylics. You need to stir the paint really well before using it, make sure all the pigments are mixed well with the thinner - then close the can and shake it well for up to a minute. Only then will the paint perform as it should.

Before you do any decaling, make sure you have glosscoated the model first, the decals becomes a lot easier to position this way. The decals should be cut from the sheet one at a time and dipped in warm water for 5-10 seconds (not until the decal starts coming off!) and then placed on a paper towel to absorb excess fluid. You can gently poke the decal with a toothpick until you feel that it starts moving around on its own, without any resistance.

Now it's ready to place onto the model. Hold the sheet with the decal next to the place you want to position it, and gently move it into place with a finger, or mayhap a toothpick or some other thing you deem appropriate. Gently. Once you're happy with the positioning of the decals, wipe off excess water (gently) with a cottonbud. Once the decals is dry enough, you can gently roll the cottonbud over the decal in several sweeps to remove any airbubbles trapped underneath it.
I guess the keyword here is "gently" :D 

I've only ever dealt with Bburago models, they have a metal body and don't require any painting. Got 6 of them (1/24 scale)
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gfRally said:
I haven't looked for a long time, but does anyone still make Rally cars?  I remember when I was younger I would see these in the hobby shops, but my Dad always talked me into American cars or Porsches :smile:  No big deal at this point in my life, I would have trashed them by now anyhow from moving etc.
Tamiya still makes rally cars, and there are a few other makers, such as Belkits, that also makes rally cars.
Do you have any links?  What I found on Tamyia website are the typical subarus and a couple of others.  Does anyone have an Audi (die cast models are in the $100's of dollars!  
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Only thing with "decals" I did was this (I know it's a bit crude). It's a Nikko 1/24 RC Corvette Tiger Shark. Was made a long time ago, back when Need for Speec Carbon was a thing. I really liked Sgt. Cross's Corvette from that game so I tried to replicate it (as best as I could at the time, now I probably would've used some kind of paint instead of sticky tape or adhesive film or whatever it's correctly called in English)
Made a custom spoiler to match the one in the game, out of some plastic and matches, drilled out the headlights and put plastic there (to resamble a Z06), it even had red and blue LED's at one point under the hood, to make the lights turn on (it was a cop car after all). Sadly it's not working anymore, but still it was a fun little project, I should probably do something like that again :)




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